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History - CE

HIS 306 – British History/The Tudor and Stuart Monarchs

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the facts and foibles of the English Monarchy. Topics to be covered include: biographical sketches of several Tudor and Stuart monarchs; the religious and political conflicts of 16th and 17th century Europe; little known facts about the lives of the monarchs and how these impacted their reign; the monarch's influence on the future course of British history.

Course Objectives:
1. articulate the biographies of various Tudor and Stuart monarchs,
2. discuss the religious and political situations in the 16th and 17th centuries,
3. explain how the course of British history was influenced by the Tudor and Stuart monarchs.

HIS 629 – History - Irish History Survey

This course is designed to introduce the student to Irish history. Topics include: Ireland from prehistory to 20th Century, contemporary politics, and cultural and socio-economic differences.

Course Objectives:
1. Demonstrate understanding of Irish history.
2. Discuss the cultural and socio-economic differences within Ireland.
3. Discuss Ireland's contemporary politics.

HIS 667 – History of Baltimore: 1729 to the Present

Explore the rise, development and impact of Baltimore from its beginnings in 1729 to the present day. Topics include Civil War, immigration, neighborhoods and row-houses, the Baltimore Fire and the port of Baltimore.

Course Objectives:
1. identify and describe the most significant historical events, places and people in Baltimore's history;
2. demonstrate an understanding of the events that transformed Baltimore from a port to an industrial city;
3. identify and locate the major historical landmarks in Baltimore; and
4. demonstrate an understanding of Baltimore's part in the development of the state and nation.

HIS 669 – WORLD SINCE 1945 AND ADVENT TE

Course Objectives:
1. cite the important changes in history since WWII and the atom bomb,
2. discuss the nuclear arms race and the results of the Cold War, and
3. discuss how world events since 1945 have shaped the world in the 21st century.

HIS 670 – Eastern European Jewelry

Examine Jewish life within the shtetls of Eastern Europe and compare it to life in America. Analyze the adaptations within Jewish life as the immigrants became Americans. Topics include Enlightenment; social change; Jewish labor movements and socialism; Yiddish culture as seen in writing, theatre and the press; scholars and intellectuals.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the Jewish world in the Shtetl and Jewish life in the Old World,
2. identify social changes which preceeded Jews leaving Europe and coming to America,
3. describe Jewish life in America, and
4. analyze the adaptations within Jewish life, as the immigrants became Americans.

HIS 671 – SHERLOCK HOLMES

Course Objectives:
1. discuss why the character of Sherlock Holmes has endured for over a century;
2. discuss the life and works of Sir Arthur Conan-Doyle;
3. discuss the literary and historical significance of Conan-Doyle¿s writings;
4. discuss the portrayal of Sherlock Holmes on the radio, film, stage, and television; and
5. discuss the selected short stories about Sherlock Holmes.

HIS 672 – Crucial Campaigns in American History-Part 1

Examine in-depth six crucial American military campaigns: Quebec, Long Island, Saratoga, Cowpens, the failed attempt to take Canada in 1813 and the successful defense of Baltimore in 1814. Topics include leaders of the campaigns on both sides; tactics and strategies of each opposing army and what made the campaigns crucial.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the failures and successes of the campaigns,
2. identify the strengths and weaknesses of each campaign's plans and strategies, and
3. describe the daily experiences of the soldiers during each campaign.

HIS 677 – Great Naval Battles of the Pacific War

Examine the role of the big gun, torpedoes and airplanes in the naval battles of World War II. Develop an in-depth understanding of nine of the most important carrier battles.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss strategies and tactics of each battle, as well as the role played by guns, torpedoes, airplanes, and commanders on both sides;
2. analyze the influence of new technologies on the decision-making and outcome of each battle; and
3. develop the ability to identify how each battle influenced the outcome of specific campaigns in the war and the future of warfare

HIS 678 – MARYLAND HISTORY II 1861-1960

Course Objectives:
1. discuss relevant historical highlights, timeline and personalities of Maryland from 1861 to the 1960¿s;
2. analyze important socio-economic trends and indicators of Maryland¿s development and population demographics from 1861 to the 1960¿s; and
3. identify key political parties and issues, primary industries and business sectors that stimulated growth and development of the state¿s economy, and main transportation hubs and routes throughout Maryland.

HIS 679 – NEAR DEATH/AFTER DEATH SCIENCE

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the subject of consciousness related to the experience of death and dying,
2. evaluate the new scientific studies by Guggenheim on after death experience and the work conducted by cardiologists on near death experiences, and
3. examine Carl Jung¿s notion of synchronicity and how it is used today by Quantum physicists to define certain experiences related to consciousness.

HIS 680 – GOLDEN AGE OF SOUND MOVIES

Course Objectives:
1. describe the old ¿studio system¿ of contract stars and huge chains of movie houses during the golden age of sound movies;
2. identify names, facts, and cinema works produced by major filmmakers from the 1930¿s through 1960¿s and location settings used in representative movies;
3. describe the role of technology and economics and the impact on the future of the feature movie production industry.

HIS 681 – HISTORY/GREAT/BRITAIN/EMPIRE

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the effects that Napoleon had on Great Britain and how the Congress of Vienna affected Britain and the part it would play in a reconstructed Europe after 1815;
2. analyze how the treaty of Versailles led directly to the coming of the second World War, and what Great Britain could have done to prevent it; and
3. identify the Duke of Wellington¿s various roles in British History, the many roles played by Sir Winston Churchill, the differences in the positions of leadership shown by Benjamin Disraeli, and William Gladstone, and the deficiencies in leadership shown by Great Britain between the two World Wars

HIS 682 – US CONGRESS: WHAT HAPPENED?

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the reasons behind the evolution of the national legislature as we find it today;
2. analyze the forces that influence members of Congress and how notable Congressional leaders maintain and solidify their power; and
3. identify the following: how a bill becomes a law; the salaries and benefits of Congress, the generalized and special powers of Congress, and additional Congressional prerequisites.

HIS 683 – GREAT COMMANDERS

Course Objectives:
1. identify the period of warfare during which each commander waged war and the social, political, and diplomatic factors which influenced their battle campaigns;
2. discuss the peculiar set of circumstances surrounding each commander¿s ability to hold either absolute or limited command or how these affected the plans, strategies, and outcomes of their campaigns; and
3. identify each commander¿s contribution to warfare and the lessons to commanders, peoples, and countries today

HIS 684 – LATIN AMERICA LANDS PEOPLE I

Course Objectives:
1. define the principle physiographic regions of Latin America;
2. describe aspects of pre-Columbian societies including religion, astronomy, mathematics and the Maya calendar; and
3. discuss the historical cultural influences, politics and agricultural practices in Latin America.

HIS 687 – Perspectives on Jesus

Examine a variety of perspectives on the life and teachings of Jesus. Explore the particular view points of the gospel writers, the apostle Paul, early church fathers, contemporary scholars and viewpoints of Jesus from other religious traditions.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the gospel writers perspectives of Jesus;
2. critically examine information about Jesus; and
3. discuss the perspectives of Jesus from the religious viewpoints of of Buddhism, Islam, and Judaism.

HIS 688 – Baltimore in the Best of Times and the Worst of Times

Reflect on the events in Baltimore's history that recall times of success and times of crisis. Topics include the rise of the B&O Railroad, the 1814 British attack on Baltimore, 19th century philanthropy, Great Baltimore Fire, the harbor renaissance and others.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of Baltimore's history;
2. identify major aspects of urban crisis management;
3. compare Baltimore's response to urban crisis with other major cities in similar crisis; and
4. demonstrate the ability to locate Baltimore's cultural and historic resources.

HIS 689 – Terrorism and Counterterrorism Part I

Examine the origins and evolution of modern terrorism, as well as the challenges posed by terrorist groups and the strategies employed to combat them. Review the psychological, socio-economical, political and religious causes of terrorist violence, past and present; the strengths and weaknesses of various counterterrorist strategies; the beliefs of terrorists and the conditions that produce and sustain them.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the history and motivations for terrorism;
2. cite a working definition of terrorism to distinguish it from other violent acts;
3. list examples of terrorist groups and agendas;
4. describe the root causes, motivations, and logic of terrorism; and
5. explain al Qaeda's organization, world views, and activities.

HIS 697 – Jews of Arab Lands

Study the migration of these Jewish communities, from their origins in Arab lands to the state of Israel. Topics include the Arab refugees who fled Palestine when the state of Israel was founded; Jewish refugees who fled Arab countries shortly before and after Israel's independence in 1948; why they were refugees in Israel; their persecution by the Arab majority and their loss of land and property.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the roots of Arab intolerance toward the Jewish presence in the Middle East,
2. trace the origins of Jews from Arab lands to the State of Israel,
3. discuss the implication of the Jewish-Arab history to current refugee issues, and
4. analyze the Arab-Israeli conflict.

HIS 698 – Generals North and South Part 2

Learn about five United States generals and five Confederate generals and their impact on the outcome of the Civil War. Examine the Civil War records ('warts and all') of these generals: Rosecrans, Burnside, Hooker, Buell, Halleck, Bragg, Beauregard, Hood, Forest and Stuart.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each of the ten selected generals,
2. analyze the generals' war records as to their professional abilities as a soldier, and
3. identify their impact on the victory or defeat of their respective cause.

HIS 699 – African American History

Examine the origin of African American people in continental Africa and trace the Black experience in America to the present.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate the ability to analyze and think critically about contemporary American society as it relates to the history of African-Americans;
2. identify the relevant antecedent events and ideologies that have shaped current public issues;
3. recognize and discuss the connections between African-Americans and the African Diaspora; and
4. compare and contrast the experiences of African-Americans of different national origins, genders, classes, and ideologies.

HIS 700 – History of the United States

Survey America's early clash of cultures. Discuss topics such as America's European and African background, settlement, Revolution, new government, expansion and sectionalism through the Civil War. This class is also offered for credit as HIST 111.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze and discuss significant geo-political relationships;
2. analyze the significance of historical events to the evolution of American ideas, social structure, economic policies, and foreign affairs; and
3. discuss the role that religion, race, class, gender, and ethnicity play in influencing historical issues and events.

HIS 703 – America 1775 to 1800

Examine and discuss, in detail, the events which shaped the history of America from 1775 to 1800.

Course Objectives:
1. describe how the US fought and won independence,
2. discuss the fundamentals of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, and
3. discuss how George Washington established the customs and procedures that have been incorporated into the US government.

HIS 704 – The Impact of Biblical Personalities on Our World Today

Become familiar with various biblical personalities and examine their roles, actions and effect on society and history in the Old Testament and upon our nation and world today. Topics include new approaches to biblical studies, issues and personalities in the Bible and the roles and actions of selected personalities, including Adam and Eve, Abraham, Isaac and Ishmael, Jacob (Israel), Moses, King David and others.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss new approaches to study the Bible;
2. identify and discuss biblical personalities and issues related in the Bible; and
3. assess the stories and experiences of the biblical characters as they relate to our own lives, our nation, and our world.

HIS 706 – The Literary Genre of Mystery

Consider the origins and development of mystery, detective and espionage fiction, discussing it as a literary genre and a reflection of popular culture. Topics include the first 1,000 years to Edgar Allen Poe; Sherlock Holmes and his rivals; the golden age (1920s and 30s); the silver age (1940s and 50s); Cozies and Christies; hard-boiled and noir; around the world; espionage fiction; mystery in the movies and other media and expanding the genre.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the development of mystery, detective, and espionage fiction;
2. discuss how mystery fiction is a literary genre and a reflection of popular culture;
3. cite examples from the history of mystery fiction;
4. identify mystery in other media; and
5. discuss why some mystery fiction is favored and others are not favored.

HIS 707 – Archaeology and the Bible II

Explore the evidence of Hebrews in Egypt, their exodus and their invasion of Canaan; major conflicting theories about the years before Solomon and when Biblical stories were first written; Israel's early heroes - Samson, David, Solomon, Hezekiah, Isaiah and Jeremiah; the fall of the Northern Kingdom; the influence of the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Persians, the Greeks, and the Romans; Herod the Great; Jesus of Nazareth and and the Dead Sea scrolls.

Course Objectives:
1. describe how artifacts of ancient cultures provide a framework for historical Biblical narratives;
2. cite conflicting theories about when Biblical stories were first written; and
3. discuss the evolution and influences of early empires, including their political, cultural, and economic development, on Biblical writing.

HIS 710 – On the Shoulders of Giants of Science

Examine the early Greek thinkers through the 20th Century including Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Copernicus, Galileo and others. Learn about classical physics; the foundation of modern engineering through the work of Newton, Maxwell; modern physics and the 20th century including Einstein, Hubble, Heisenberg and Hawking.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the evolution of Western science,
2. cite major contributors to the progress of Western science, and
3. discuss major contributors to science and to a deeper understanding of the physical universe.

HIS 712 – The American Myth in Westerns and War Movies

Learn more about the part of our American culture that was created by or reinforced by the Western and War movies from the 1930s to the 1960s. Discuss the "shoot-em-ups" of the 1930s; the singing westerns; the low-budget western; the adult western (pre December 7th); the all-American platoon; the blatant propaganda and racism of WWII films; post 1945 revisionist films and the anti-war films.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze select films for comments on American culture,
2. discuss how select films reinforce American values,
3. recognize select value-based themes for young people and adults,
4. demonstrate an understanding of revisionist attitudes towards the 'enemy' to include the Indians in Westerns and the Germans and the Japanese in war movies.

HIS 713 – Great Decisions 2008

Through non-partisan, balanced and informed discussion, learn the challenges now faced by the United States and the international community including the Iraq end-game; European Union at 50; talking to our enemies; how US deals with terrorism; Russia; U.S. defense and security policy; Latin America: shift to the left; US - China trade policy and private philanthropy.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss views on US foreign policy;
2. identify basic points of reference and collections of facts which support an understanding of the issues that face the US,
3. identify non-partisan and well-informed sources for information such as background, current data, current US policy, and the pros and cons of alternate policy options.

HIS 714 – World History in the 20th Century

Examine major historical events of the 20th century, and learn how these events impact life today.

Course Objectives:
1. cite major historical events in chronological order and location,
2. demonstrate an understanding of 20th century history in relation to the US,
3. identify significant historical figures of the 20th century,
4. discuss the impact of select events on contemporary society, and
5. describe the rise of the US as a superpower.

HIS 715 – Napoleon Bonaparte: Man, Myth, and Reality

Enhance knowledge and relevance of the history and culture of Napoleonic Europe and its people. Topics include Napoleon's impact on the world in general and Europe in particular; the economy, especially the development of industries and trades during this time; the arts and inventions and prominent leaders and their respective countries.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss relevant historical highlights in relation to the timeline and personalities of Napoleonic Europe;
2. analyze the outcomes of famous battles of the period to include the numerous coalitions aligned against Napoleon;
3. identify the key nation states and issues of Napoleonic Europe; and
4. discuss Napoleon's legacy on European arts, governments, sciences, and economies.

HIS 716 – The American Presidency (Part 1)

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the important events of the U.S. presidency. The course will be covered thematically, not chronologically. Topics to be covered include Lincoln and the Civil War, Theodore Roosevelt and the birth of American imperialism, Truman and the decision to drop the atomic bomb, Kennedy and the Cuban missile crisis, and Nixon and the Watergate scandal.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the gamut of topics covered in the course, the intricacies that made them important, the people involved in the course topics, and the roles that they played in the dramas;
2. analyze each topic according to what started the problem, how the problem developed, and how it was resolved; and
3. identify the main personalities involved in all three aspects of the analysis not just the president and his advisors, but antagonists and their points of view, lobbyists, pressure groups, newspaper reporters editors and social commentators.

HIS 717 – The History and Value of Antiques

Learn the fundamentals and historic periods of antiques including discussions of art work, collectables, porcelain, glassware, sterling silver, furniture and changes in styles from ancient times to the present. Topics include history and value of antiques; research tools to further investigate items; care and maintenance of antiques and how and where to liquidate antiques.

Course Objectives:
1. assess historic periods and the difference between an antique and a reproduction,
2. develop the ability to research various sources to determine the value and history of antiques, and
3. identify how and where to liquidate antiques.

HIS 718 – Electoral Politics in America

Take an in-depth look at the presidential nomination and election process in the US, focusing on the history and current workings of the Electoral College, as well as presidential primaries, caucuses, the delegate selection process, national nominating conventions and problems faced today in a growing world of technology.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the inner workings of the Electoral College and how the founders of our nation intended for it to work,
2. analyze the outcomes of controversial elections and how the Electoral College has influenced American politics, and
3. identify future methods and designs for electoral reform in the future.

HIS 720 – U.S. History from the Dawn to the New Nation

Investigate the settlement of the North American continent by Europeans, and witness the emergence and establishment of the new nation of America through their eyes. Topics include the first Americans; the Columbian exchange; the 13 colonies; French and Indian wars; the route to revolution; American revolution; Articles of Confederation; Federalists and Jefferson's administration.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate how the 'American character' and the actions of today may be traced to our origins, and, especially, to our images of those beginnings;
2. explain how the North American continent was settled by Europeans; and
3. discuss the emergence and establishment of the new nation.

HIS 723 – Science and Religion

Trace the historic relationships between science and religion in Western culture. Investigate the differences and similarities in approach, methods, sources of knowledge and philosophical underpinnings. Look at major leaders of both groups over the years tracing the ideas of reason vs. faith.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how science and religion have been central to the development and evolution of western civilization and culture,
2. develop the ability to trace the historical relationship between the two,
3. demonstrate how this relationship has been both harmonious and adversarial, and
4. discuss the ideas of some of the leading proponents.

HIS 724 – Korean War

Become acquainted with the proximate causes of the 1950-53 Korean War, its conduct through the first winter (1950-51) and the primary military leaders. Consider the history, including the origin, Chinese domination and Japanese occupation; division between Soviets and U.S.; U.S. occupation and the Cold War; geography, topography and weather and the war and its many aspects.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the role of the U.S. in Korea,
2. discuss the importance of Korea in U.S. military strategy, and
3. discuss the history and conduct of the war through the summer of 1951

HIS 725 – British History Victorian Era to the Present

Explore the history of the British Empire spanning the Victorian era to the present. Topics include customs; everyday life; social and political issues of 19th and 20th England and the influence of the British Empire in the world at that time and its impact on daily life in England.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the influence of the British Empire from the 19th Century to the present day, and cite the pivotal role of the monarchy in British society;
2. discuss the factors that transferred Great Britain into a formidable world power in the 19th and 20th Centuries, as well as its standing in today's world; and
3. describe and analyze the various social and political factors that propelled Great Britain into becoming a world power and impacting the rest of the world.

HIS 726 – Introduction to Archaeology

Learn about the basic principles of archaeology. Topics include the rudimentary concepts of archaeology, famous digs which uncovered important historical information, archaeological terminology, historical findings and famous sites.

Course Objectives:
1. describe how archeologists scientifically examine the artifacts of ancient civilizations, and
2. discuss the importance of these remains to modern societies.

HIS 727 – Foundations of Faith

Explore the sources, beliefs and practices of Christianity, with more than a nodding introduction to Judaism and Islam. Examine the stories of some of the people who have influenced the American religious experience.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss or describe the impact of religion on our lives and culture,
2. analyze the sources of religious authority and the characteristics of religious experience, and
3. identify the significant differences among three of the great religions of the world and some significant characters in the religious history of the United States.

HIS 728 – US History Anti-Bellum America

Examine the remarkable growth and the disparate cultures that the U.S. experienced at its beginning, and see how this lead to civil war. Topics include the war of 1812; the era of good feelings; the age of Jackson; the Mexican war; two cultures in one nation; the westward way; the doughfaces; the arts of literature of pre-war America and how one nation became two.

Course Objectives:
1. describe in general the events that took place during the first seven decades after the establishment of the US;
2. explain the remarkable growth experienced by the US, and show how this helped the country develop a sense of itself;
3. identify the two disparate cultures that pulled the country apart; and
4. discuss the factors that led to the Civil War.

HIS 729 – US History from the Civil War to the Gilded Age

Take a detailed look at the various aspects of the Civil War, and then consider how the nation healed and began the process of healing again. Topics include the Civil War, parts 1 through 5; reconstruction; the gilded age; Grant and Hayes; the Cleveland administration - and between; the west wild and the west mild and American life in the late 19th century.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss why and how the nation became divided and engaged in a fierce civil war,
2. identify the many issues that led to the war,
3. demonstrate how the results of that war are still with us today, and
4. describe the healing process that took place after the war.

HIS 730 – Baltimore's Architectural Landmarks

Study the development of architecture in Baltimore City through its landmarks and the individuals who designed them. Explore the City's historical and architectural development from the 18th century to the present.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the major architectural landmarks of Baltimore city as seen in photographs,
2. identify and briefly describe in broad terms the major architectural styles found in Baltimore,
3. develop the ability to name some of the major architects who have left their imprint on the city,
4. identify five architecturally important buildings and name the architects who designed them, and
5. describe three events in the city's history that influenced its architecture.

HIS 731 – Christian Denominations in the United States

Learn why there are over one hundred different Christian denominations in the U.S. Topics include tracing each group's history to its founder; exploring major issues that contributed to its creation; comparing similarities and differences between groups and theology, polity and sociology.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the major differences between the Christian churches in the U.S.,
2. identify and assess the shifting of membership and shifting between denominations,
3. demonstrate a firmer understanding of his/her own faith and practice, and
4. articulate a better understanding of conservative/ liberal, and terms such as 'born again' and 'apostolic succession'.

HIS 733 – Maryland in the Civil War

Discuss Maryland's pivotal role during the Civil War and how the state teetered on the edge of secession; the Pratt Street Riots; the occupation of Baltimore and our state anthem; Maryland battles at Hagerstown and Monocracy and Civil War sites still accessible in Maryland today.

Course Objectives:
1. identify major campaigns in the war,
2. describe political context for Maryland¿s unique position in the war, and
3. describe the impact of Maryland¿s position on the outcome of the war.

HIS 735 – United States Foreign Policy

Examine the appropriateness of U.S. foreign policy decisions, history (and context) of U.S. foreign policy, how to determine the value of a foreign policy decision, the definition, types and evaluation of U.S. foreign policy as well as current U.S. policy.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss US foreign policy throughout history,
2. analyze foreign policy decisions, and
3. identify foreign policy factors, (including decisions of the presidents and foreign policy typologies).

HIS 736 – Crucial Campaigns of the Civil War in Tennessee, Georgia and the Carolinas

Learn how Robert E. Lee defeated numerically superior armies in the East while the Confederacy lost a number of crucial campaigns and battles west of the Appalachians. Explore the daily life of leaders and soldiers on both sides; factors of geography and logistics and strategy and tactics.

Course Objectives:
1. evaluate what made the western theater different from the eastern theater;
2. describe the background and personalities of the generals on both sides in the western theater and how those factors affected strategic plans and battlefield decisions;
3. identify major Union figures in the West and minor figures;
4. discuss daily life in battle for ordinary soldiers on both sides, on the march, in the hospital, and in the camps; and
5. cite the importance of battlefield preservation for future generations.

HIS 737 – Politics of the World

Explore the question 'Why is this happening?' as it relates to politics around the world. More than merely a current-events course; this seeks to explain and to view conflicts and hot spots that might forecast events. Discuss the purpose and effectiveness of the U.N.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss current world events including the causes, the actors, and the U.S. positions;
2. analyze the effectiveness of actions, and the effects of geography, religion, and nationalism on the events of history; and
3. identify hot spots throughout the world, traditional antagonists, and origins of conflict.

HIS 738 – The History and Value of Antiques

Learn about the fundamentals plus the historic periods of antiques. Discuss art work, collectables, porcelain, glassware, sterling silver, furniture and changes in styles from ancient times to the present. Topics will include research tools for further investigation; care and maintenance of antiques; how and where to liquidate antiques.

Course Objectives:
1. assess historic periods and the difference between an antique and a reproduction,
2. research various sources to determine the value and history of antiques, and
3. identify how and where to liquidate antiques.

HIS 739 – History of Master Composers Bach, Beethoven and Brahms

Learn from an historical perspective how Bach became the "father of the foundation of western music". Through short musical samples, examine the styles and contributions these three composers made to symphonic music and chamber music.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate a familiarity with formal designs used by the composers,
2. compare the styles, themes and variations of each composer in symphonic and chamber music, and
3. describe contributions these three composers have made to western music.

HIS 741 – Israel at 60

Learn how Israel became a state and examine the events that took place during the past 60 years including late 19th century Palestine and the U.N partition of it into two states, anti-Semitism as manifested in the Dreyfus Affair; Israel on May 15, 1948; wars; leaders, challenges and solutions.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the historical background which led to the establishment of the state of Israel.
2. demonstrate an understanding of the wide diversity of people who reside in the land, and the problems surrounding so many cultures living together.
3. comprehend the challenges confronting Israel today, and formulate possible solutions for future peace.

HIS 743 – The 60's, Will They Ever End?

Learn how the events of the 1960s still influence life today. Topics include the Vietnam War; the Civil Rights movement; the Women's movement; the Cold War; the Missile crisis; the assassinations of the Kennedys and Martin L. King and the urban riots.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how the 1960¿s still impact our lives and our country,
2. describe the Civil Rights and Women¿s Movements, and
3. demonstrate how our present candidates and future president are representative of these various movements and changes.

HIS 744 – The Men Who Fought and Planned World War II

Learn the crucial roles played by Marshall, King, Arnold, MacAthur, Nimitz, Eisenhower, Halsey, Patton, Churchill and Roosevelt in the Allied victory over Germany, Italy and Japan. Topics include the war campaign, tactics and strategies and the integral roles of the leaders in World War II.

Course Objectives:
1. identify and evaluate ten leaders and their roles in the Allied victory over Germany, Italy, and Japan;
2. discuss the significance of each leader¿s individual contribution to the Allied victory; and
3. evaluate the significant roles played by each of these men in various campaigns throughout the war.

HIS 745 – Government and Politics in Contemporary Middle East

Learn the importance of the Middle East in world affairs. Topics include the historical, geographic, economic and political importance of the Middle East; Islam; the Arab-Israeli conflict and peace process; the Arab world; the non-Arab Islamic states; the extreme Islamic groups and terrorism.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the importance of Middle Eastern politics, economics and security to the US and the Free World;
2. explain the complexities of the Arab- Israeli conflict;
3. discuss the constant threat posed by extremist Muslim groups, such as Al Quida, Hamas and Hizbola; and
4. assess the economic importance of the Middle East.

HIS 746 – The Civil War in Maryland

Learn the relevance of the history and key events of the Civil War in the state of Maryland. Topics include Maryland's crucial role and impact on the Country; the effects the war had on the state's economy, industries and trades; how the war caused prominent leaders and ordinary citizens to take sides and Maryland's Civil War heritage.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the relevant historical highlights, timeline, and personalities of Maryland during the Civil war,
2. analyze the important outcomes resulting from famous battles in and around Maryland,
3. describe the effectiveness of both the Northern and Southern espionage and support services activities in the state, and
4. identify the key Maryland personalities that played an important role for their respective causes.

HIS 748 – FDR, Truman, and Eisenhower

Examine the 30 most tumultuous years of the 20th Century and the three presidents who governed the U.S. during those times. Topics include the personal lives and experiences of these three presidents; their political views; their styles of governing; their involvement in WWII and the great depression and WWII.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of how these three presidents¿ personal lives and experiences formed their political views and styles of governing,
2. discuss their involvement in World War II, and
3. describe the Great Depression (disaster) and World War II (triumph).

HIS 749 – Monarchs of the British Isles-Part I

Learn the history of England through the lives of its monarchs. Topics include introduction and geography, pre-history and legend, 1066, Henry II's children, the Plantaganets, Scotland and the Tudors.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the history of England from the beginning to the reign of the Tudors,
2. identify the saints and the sinners,
3. discuss the scandals and the successions, and
4. assess the impact of Scotland on this history.

HIS 751 – American History: Colonial Period to the Revolution

Explore the social, political and economic aspects of American life from its early days until the American Revolution. Topics include settlements in the New World, major European powers involved, Native Americans, African Americans and impact of colonization on world events.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the social, political and economic aspects of American life in those early days,
2. identify the settlements and Major European powers involved,
3. describe the life of Native and African Americans, and
4. evaluate the impact of colonization on world events.

HIS 752 – Great Decisions 2009

Learn the challenges now faced by the United States and the international community through non-partisan, balanced and informed discussion. Topics include eight issues of concern to U.S. policy makers today and that represent our foreign policy challenges of tomorrow. Subjects are: special envoys, Kenya & R2P, global crime, U.S.-China secret relations, global financial crisis, Russia & its neighbors, Persian Gulf, Peace-Building and Conflict resolution.

Course Objectives:
1. present informed, thoughtful and articulate views on foreign policy issues facing the United States;
2. identify basic and accepted collections of points of reference and facts related to issues facing the United States; and
3. identify non-partisan and well-informed sources of background, current data, current US policy, and the pros and cons of alternate policy options.

HIS 755 – History of Baltimore: Bygone Baltimore and the Great Baltimore Fire

Examine the history of Baltimore City from 1729 to the present. Topics include historical events in Baltimore City's history and the great Baltimore Fire and its aftermath.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate knowledge of Baltimore City's history, and
2. describe the fire and its effect on the city and citizens of Baltimore.

HIS 757 – Winston Churchill: His Life and Times

Celebrate this famed British leader by exploring his early life, army service and service to his government along with his efforts during both war time and times of peace.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the life of one of the most influential men in modern times,
2. list the milestones in his life from 2nd Lieutenant to Prime Minister,
3. evaluate his influence in World War I and World War II, and
4. cite his involvement in world events, especially before, during and after World War II.

HIS 758 – The Early Cold War

Examine the internal and external events that shaped the US during this time from transition to peace through the Vietnam conflict; from Truman through Nixon and more.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss how U.S. history is a history of change, occurring because of internal events and national leaders;
2. explain why the U.S. found itself with extensive international obligations;
3. cite examples of worldwide concerns as well as national requirements for which the U.S. found itself responsible; and
4. list important events in the Cold War.

HIS 759 – World War II

Observe World War II from the U.S. perspective and see the effect it had on the world. Discuss the world wide march to war, North Africa and the Mediterranean, the Pacific, intelligence, the Bulge, and war's end and the aftermath.

Course Objectives:
1. explain the overall scope of the war,
2. identify and discuss some of the major battles,
3. describe the war from the US perspective,
4. discuss the effect the war had on the rest of the world, and
5. assess the global aspect of the war on non-combatant countries.

HIS 760 – The US Enters the Modern World

Learn how the U.S. changed during the period prior to World War II in the fields of politics, economics and culture. Examine the presidential administrations and events that took place during the period between World War I and World War II.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss how the United States remade itself after the Civil War;
2. describe the profound changes that the United States underwent in the early 20th Century;
3. explain how some of these changes were caused by technological developments, some by the people involved, and some by external events; and
4. list the important events that helped shape America during this time.

HIS 761 – Global Terrorism and Its Impact on Society

Examine the definition, causes and consequences of terrorism View historical analysis and look at international groups, supporting states, acts, tactics, behaviors, goals, motivation, fundamentalist Islam, and the US war on terrorism.

Course Objectives:
1. identify terrorist groups throughout history,
2. cite a number of present day international terrorist groups,
3. describe their tactics, behavior and goals,
4. assess fundamentalist Islam's impact on terrorism, and
5. discuss the role of the US war on terrorism.

HIS 763 – Presidential Role in American Political System

Examine the unique role of the president of the United States in the American political system. Topics include different types of democratic systems of government; the American presidential system; major responsibilities; the electoral process; the federal bureaucracy; presidential relationship with congress and the judicial system and presidential powers and actions.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how the presidency is the major apparatus of the U.S. government;
2. discuss the functions, duties, and responsibilities of the President;
3. identify the different areas of the federal bureaucracy; and
4. explain the relationship between the President, Congress and the Judiciary.

HIS 764 – Baltimore County's Famed Inns and Their History

Explore the detailed history of three of Baltimore County's famed inns and famous historical figures associated with these inns. Topics include the Milton Inn, Manor Tavern and Valley Inn."

Course Objectives:
1. locate and cite historical facts about each place,
2. discuss John Wilkes Booth and his ties to the Milton Inn, and
3. describe George Washington's link to the Valley Inn.

HIS 766 – The History of Piracy: Under the Black Flag

Learn about the history of piracy from the earliest known records to modern times. Topics include definition of piracy; piracy in the ancient world; piracy in the China Seas; the 'Golden Age of Piracy'; pirate as 'Robin Hood'; myth versus reality and modern images of pirates.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the development of piracy from its beginnings to the modern day;
2. demonstrate an understanding of pirate life-ways, tactics, and motivation; and
3. discuss the difference between popular pirate myths and reality.

HIS 767 – Baltimore During the Revolutionary Generation

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the city of Baltimore during the Revolutionary generation. Topics to be covered include historical monuments and memorials, military and political history of the war, and archeological styles.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the variety of archeological styles prevalent in Baltimore;
2. identify and describe significant historical events, monuments, and memorials;
3. describe Baltimore's contributions to the history of the U.S.; and
4. discuss the military/political history of the war.

HIS 769 – History of Baltimore's Famed Family Art Collections

This course is designed to enable the student to trace the history of three famous Baltimore family art collections. Topics to be covered include the Cone sisters, who gathered one of the finest collections of Modern French art in the United States; Henry Walters, who expanded the scope of acquisitions bequested him by his father, by purchasing the contents of a palace in Rome containing over 1700 pieces; and the Garrets, a railroad family whose Evergreen museum is an intimate collection of fine art, decorative items, rare books and manuscripts.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the three famous families and their history,
2. discuss the importance of each of these collections, and
3. describe their influence on the literary life of Baltimore.

HIS 770 – Winston Churchill: His Life and Times

Examine the life of this statesman and the world events that took place during his life. Topics include his childhood, army life, government service WWI & II, terms as Prime Minister, and his last years.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss, in general, the life of one of the most influential men in modern times,
2. list the milestones in his life from 2nd Lieutenant to Prime Minister,
3. evaluate his influence in World War I and World War II, and
4. cite his involvement in world events, especially before, during and after World War II.

HIS 771 – Genocide in Historical Perspective Part I

Discuss not only the Holocaust, but other genocide incidents through history. Topics on genocide include meaning/definition/characteristics, hatred, Biblical examples, genocide in antiquity, and examples of it in the middle ages and modern times.

Course Objectives:
1. define the meaning and characteristics of genocide,
2. discuss genocide in ancient and modern times, and
3. identify examples of genocide that occurred throughout history, other than the Holocaust.

HIS 772 – Genocide in Historical Perspective Part II

Explore genocide in a broader view that will include the Nazi era in Germany; Hitler's Germany and the Holocaust; Cambodia under Pol Pot; Serbian massacre of Muslims in Bosnia-Herzegovenia, Japanese atrocities in Nanking China; genocide in Rwanda and Darfur.

Course Objectives:
1. describe in detail the Holocaust of Hitler's Germany,
2. identify the acts of genocide presented in this course,
3. review the Geneva convention which made genocide an international crime, and
4. discuss the Nuremberg trials of Nazi war criminals.

HIS 773 – BALTIMORE COUNTY/RAILROAD

Discover how the Northern Central Railroad helped to establish the town of Monkton, and how the Western Maryland Railroad helped establish the town of Glyndon. Explore topics including the Monkton Church and Cemetery; the North Central Railroad walking and biking trail; Emory Grove; and the Glyndon Methodist Church.

Course Objectives:
1. locate and cite historical facts about the towns of Monkton and Glyndon;
2. describe how the growth of rail lines led to the growth of villages, hotels, and eventually the suburbs of Baltimore County; and
3. discuss the architecture and religious influence in the towns of Monkton and Glyndon.

HIS 774 – The Life and Literature of F. Scott Fitzgerald

Explore, analyze and discuss the history, life, cultural influences and legacy of Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald, who died thinking he had been a "dismal failure" but whose insight spoke for a generation. You will get an overview of this author through selected short stores and his five novels.

Course Objectives:
1. compare and investigate the significance of the author¿s work, and his integration of plot, characters, settings, and themes to create a unique style;
2. apply literary tools to analyze and discuss the author¿s techniques and talent; and
3. analyze and discuss clues to Fitzgerald¿s enduring legacy and impact on the modern American novel.

HIS 775 – Career Trajectories in the Entertainment Industry

Examine different paths to success taken by members of the entertainment industry, From an historical perspective, explore careers of Barbra Streisand, Marlon Brando, Lucille Ball, Marilyn Monroe, John Wayne and others.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the steps and techniques that various entertainers have taken to be successful,
2. cite opportunities offered to them to move ahead in their fields of endeavor, and
3. describe the history of modern and former film stars - the trials and tribulations of their career.

HIS 776 – Abraham Lincoln

Examine the life of Abraham Lincoln, from his early life to his legacy. Topics to be covered include early life, family, legal career, politics, presidential elections, war years, slavery, assassination, and legacy.

Course Objectives:
1. provide a thumbnail sketch of Lincoln¿s life,
2. evaluate his impact on American history,
3. critique the importance of his speeches,
4. discuss his role in the slavery issue,
5. describe his tactics in the Civil War, and
6. assess the effect his assassination had on the country.

HIS 777 – Countries of the World

This course is designed to enable students to explore different countries around the world, their history, customs and political and economic structures. Topics to be covered include New Zealand, Poland, Ethiopia, Vietnam, Hong Kong, and Italy.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the history of these countries,
2. describe the customs of the peoples, and
3. discuss the political and economic customs of each country.

HIS 778 – CIVIL WAR: ROBERT E. LEE

Explore the life and military career of General Robert E. Lee. Topics include Lee at Antietam, the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, surrender at Appomattox, Lee's greatest victories and failures, and AP Hill and Lee during the Petersburg siege.

Course Objectives:
1. evaluate Lee as a commander in the battle of Antietam,
2. discuss the fatal wounding of Jackson at Chancellorsville and its effects on the Confederacy,
3. discuss the terms issued by Grant at Lee¿s surrender at Appomattox, and
4. compare and contrast Lee¿s great victories and failures.

HIS 779 – Righteous Gentiles: Those Who Saved Us

This course is designed to enable the student to examine the role of Gentiles who saved the lives of Jews during World War II. Topics include the Final Solution; concentration camps and extermination; Gentiles of all religions who risked their lives to save persecuted Jews; organizations established by the grateful Jewish community; and stories from holocaust survivors.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the plight of the Jews during World War II,
2. describe concentration camps and extermination,
3. identify the type of men and women who risked so much to help save the persecuted Jews, and
4. list the organizations founded by the grateful Jewish community.

HIS 780 – IMPORTANCE OF MD IN CIVIL WAR

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the importance of the State of Maryland in the American Civil War. Topics to be covered include life in Maryland before the war; the secession movement; the war years; the Pratt Street riot of 1861; Lincoln's funeral in 1865; and Antietam, Gettysburg, and Monocacy campaigns.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss life in Maryland before the war,
2. explain how the fate of our country was in the hands of the Maryland legislature,
3. discuss the secession movement and the war years, and
4. describe the different campaigns that took place on Maryland soil.

HIS 781 – Role of Congress in the American Political Process

Learn the importance of Congress as one of the three major branches of our government; and how in all legislation ( domestic or foreign) Congress plays a major role. Discuss Article 1 of the Constitution listing the powers of Congress and requirements to be elected; Congressional Leadership; committee structure; how a bill is legislated; and congressional-presidential relations.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the inter-relationship among Congress, other major branches of our government;
2. evaluate how a bill is legislated through Congress; and
3. define the important role of Congress in passing legislation about domestic or foreign policy.

HIS 782 – INDIRIA/GANDHI/WOMAN/POLITICIA

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the life of Indira Gandhi from her childhood, political career, and the events that lead to her assassination. Topics to be covered include growing up in the public eye; her marriage and her decision to enter Indian politics; a brief history of the Sikh religion, and the events that preceded the destruction of the sacred Golden Temple.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss reasons behind the assassination of Indira Gandhi and the complexity of the mind set behind the act,
2. describe the life and political career of the first and only woman elected as Prime Minister of India, and
3. define the Sikh religion and evaluate the events that led to the destruction of the sacred Golden Temple.

HIS 783 – SCANDALS IN USA/WORLD HISTORY

This course will enable the student to learn the effect of political and personal scandals on US and world history, and the similarities and differences in historic and present American scandals. Topics to be covered include Sally Hemmings; Andrew Jackson's marriage; Grover Cleveland and his mistress; Woodrow Wilson; Warren Harding; FDR; Eisenhower; John F. Kennedy; Princess Diana; Diana Rice/Garry Hart Affair; Enron; Kurt Waldenheim, Secretary General to the UN and Nazi; Watergate; George Bush's 8 years and others.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the similarities and differences among the many historic and present American scandals,
2. evaluate what lessons have been and should have been learned from the American scandals, and
3. discuss how these scandals affected history.

HIS 784 – The Role of Congress in the American Political Process

This course is designed to enable the student to study and analyze in detail the role of Congress in the American Political Process. Topics to be covered include the American system of government, the Constitution and Congress, the US Senate, the House of Representatives, the leadership of both houses, the committees of both houses, the legislative process, and major domestic and foreign policies facing Congress.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the powers of Congress, as found in Article I of the Constitution,
2. describe the roles of both the House and Senate,
3. list the committees of both houses,
4. identify the leadership in both houses, and
5. describe the legislative process.

HIS 785 – FAMILY MUSEUM HOUSES IN BALTO

This course is designed to enable the student to learn in detail the history of three famous family museum houses in Baltimore. Topics to be covered include Mount Clare, the home of Charles Carroll, barrister, patriot and state senator; Homewood, a wedding gift from Charles Carroll of Carrollton to his son; and Hampton, home of the Ridgely family.

Course Objectives:
1. describe Mount Clare, Maryland's first museum house and one of the oldest and finest examples of colonial Georgian architecture in the city;
2. discuss Homewood, an example of late Georgian architecture, located on the grounds of Johns Hopkins University; and
3. discuss Hampton, the story of people - enslaved African Americans, indentured servants, industrial and agricultural workers and the owners, the Ridgely family.

HIS 786 – HISTORY OF BALTIMORE MUSEUMS

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the history of three special museums located in Baltimore City. Topics include the Reginald F. Lewis museum, the largest African American museum on the East Coast, in support of African American culture; the Baltimore Museum of Industry, founded in 1977 to preserve the City's rapidly disappearing industrial heritage; and the B&O Railroad museum, a national treasure of railroad artifacts, and birthplace of American railroading.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the importance and educational value of the Reginald F. Lewis museum,
2. explain the value of the Baltimore Museum of Industry to the industrial heritage of the city, and
3. identify the B&O Railroad museum as a national treasure of railroad artifacts and birthplace of American railroading.

HIS 787 – Russian Empire: Past and Present

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the history of Russia from its inception to the 1917 revolution. Topics to be covered include the origins of Russia; the Mongol invasion; the Grand Duchy of Moscow; Ivan the Great; the Tsardom of Russia; times of trouble; Imperial Russia; reaction, reform and expansion; the social and economic structure of Tsarist Russia; and war and revolution, 1914 to 1917.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the history of Russia from its inception to the 1917 revolution,
2. appraise the importance of the Grand Duchy of Moscow,
3. discuss the Tsardom of Russia,
4. define imperial Russia, and
5. describe the events surrounding the war and revolution.

HIS 788 – Russian Federation

Study the history of Russian as found in the current Soviet Federation. Topics include the 1993 Russian constitution; the legislative, executive and judicial branches; the governmental structure; political parties; economic and foreign policies.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the duties of the three branches of government,
2. discuss the governmental structure and political parties,
3. describe the importance of the local and regional governments, and
4. explain the economic and foreign policies of the Russian Federation.

HIS 789 – Soviet Socialist Republic

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the history of the Soviet Socialist Republic (USSR), and its empire from 1922 to 1991. Topics to be covered include Marxism; the fall of imperial Russia and the 1917 revolution; Lenin; Stalin; the Communist party; World War II; and collapse of the Soviet Union.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the history of the Soviet Socialist Republic from 1922 to 1991,
2. discuss the theory and philosophy of Marxism,
3. describe the importance of Lenin and Stalin,
4. explain the organization and power of the Communist party, and
5. discuss the events that led to the collapse of the Soviet Union.

HIS 790 – Countries of the World

Explore different countries around the world, their history, customs, and political and economic structure. Topics to be covered include India, New Zealand, Poland, Ethiopia, Vietnam, Hong Kong and Italy.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the history of these countries,
2. describe the customs of the peoples, and
3. discuss the political and economic customs of each country.

HIS 791 – The World of Gilbert and Sullivan

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the world of Gilbert and Sullivan and the comic operas they wrote between 1870 and the end of the 19th century. Topics to be covered include the Mikado, The Pirates of Penzance, HMS Pinafore, The Sorcerer, The Yeoman of the Guard, and The Gondoliers.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss not only the opera itself and what went into its production, but all aspects of staging a play in the late Victorian era;
2. identify many of the full time cast members who worked with Gilbert and Sullivan at the Savoy theater in London; and
3. describe the show's producer and Savoy Theatre owner D'oyley Carte, who provided the space for the productions.

HIS 792 – American History: To the New Millennium

This course is designed to enable the student to understand the drastic realignment that American society and politics underwent in the last quarter of the 20th Century. Topics to be covered include Watergate and the Ford administration; the Bicentennial period; the Reagan era; American entertainment; George Bush; the Clinton years; Fin de Sicle; George W. Bush; Iraq, Afghanistan, and terrorism; and the US in the new millennium.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the major events of the last quarter of the 20th Century as they apply to the U.S.,
2. discuss the unexpected and far-reaching changes in the international situation,
3. explain how the U.S. was forced to rethink and adjust its traditional policies, and
4. discuss these changes and their implications.

HIS 793 – South, Southeast, and Southwest Asia

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the South, Southeast, and Southwest Asia regions and their history. Topics to be covered include the land and peoples; Indochina in pre-modern times; Indochina since WWII; the Philippines; the Straits; India in pre-modern times; India since liberation; Pakistan; Central Asia; and the US and the region.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the wide range of peoples and cultures in this region of the world,
2. discuss its social and geographic diversity,
3. demonstrate how increasingly important this region is becoming to the US, and
4. demonstrate an increased understanding of the region and its history.

HIS 794 – Intelligence

This course is designed to enable the student to better understand what intelligence is, how it has developed in the Western world, and how it should exist and operate in a democratic society. Topics to be covered include what is intelligence and how did it start; US and UK intelligence in the pre-modern era; other intelligence agencies; WWII general and cryptologic intelligence; VENONA; the Cold War; and intelligence and democracy, literature, and the movies.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the general notion of intelligence;
2. explain how intelligence organizations and activities have been important tools for most countries since the Renaissance; and
3. research how it developed in the Western world, and how it should exist and operate in a democratic society.

HIS 795 – Jews of Asia

Learn how the presence of communities of Jews in Asia is consistent with how the Jewish people, dispersed and settled throughout the world. Investigate Jews of China, Japan, Korea and others Asian countries; connection to the Lost Ten Tribes of the exiled ancient Kingdom of Israel; their lives in these countries and how they maintained their Judaism.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how each Jewish community adapted to the host country;
2. identify the different Asian countries, and be able to distinguish between them; and
3. discuss how the different communities maintained their Judaism.

HIS 797 – Architecture and History: Newport Rhode Island Mansions

This course is designed to enable the student to learn to identify the historical significance and architecture of houses in Newport, Rhode Island built at the turn of the nineteenth century during the Gilded Age, and their connection to Newport society at the time. Topics to be covered include the Breakers, Marble House, the Elms, Rosecliff, Miramar, Ochre Court, Belcourt Castle, Chateau-Sur-Mer, and Beacon Rock, the Gilded Age and Newport society.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the architectural features of Newport houses at the turn of the century;
2. discuss the historical significance of these mansions and the relationship to society in Newport, Rhode Island at the turn of the century; and
3. cite names of the builders and architects of these houses during the Gilded Age.

HIS 798 – HERITAGE OF BLACK AMERICANS

This course is designed to enable the student to learn African history as it relates to the black American experience. Topics to be covered include the African continent in world perspective, African contributions to civilization, and African world connections.

Course Objectives:
1. identify Africa's role and contribution to world civilization,
2. discuss myths and realities of African life and philosophy,
3. explain the cultural affinity between Africa and African descendants in the new world, and
4. analyze impact of non-African culture on the African continent.

HIS 799 – Chinese Philosophy: Its Uniqueness

Delve into the uniqueness of the Chinese way of thinking, and how the Eastern and Western philosophies do meet in matters of importance to humanity. Topics include: Confucianism; Taoism; Buddhism; and other philosophies.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the historical and cultural background for the development of various Chinese philosophies;
2. discuss the competition between major philosophies and how they influenced and were influenced by political forces; and
3. explain how philosophical traditions defined not only Chinese culture, but the daily life of virtually all of East Asia.

HIS 800 – Great American Authors Part I

Examine a number of great American authors, and a classic work from each one. Those authors include: Nathaniel Hawthorne; Herman Melville; Mark Twain; Jack London; and Willa Cather.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze and discuss what may classify an author as 'great', and determine how this has developed and altered from the 19th Century to current times;
2. apply literary tools to assess the specific qualities of each work as a 'good read', and the relationship to societal influences; and
3. compare, contrast, and discuss writing styles and each author's development of plot, themes, settings, and characters, relevant to their durability.

HIS 801 – Operas of Puccini, Mozart, Wagner, and Bizet

Learn about the components of opera, become acquainted with the lives of these composers, and study the themes and the elements that are included in Madame Butterfly; Don Giovanni; Die Meistersingers; and Carmen.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the music, stories, and formal designs of these operas;
2. explain the themes of these three operas; and
3. analyze these operas, explaining how the elements of music, drama, voice, and human nature work together to create a single art form.

HIS 803 – Music by Master American Composers

Delve into the uniqueness of classic American composers, Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, Rogers and Hammerstein and Ira and George Gershwin, examine their contribution to the history of music, impact on the American musical scene and musical theatre, and the emergence of this form of theatre art.

Course Objectives:
1. assess the musical impact of musical theater as an uniquely American art form;
2. evaluate its contribution to the history of music;
3. explain its impact on the American social scene; and
4. discuss the music of Porter, Berlin, Rogers and Hammerstein, and Ira and George Gershwin.

HIS 804 – World History in the 20th Century

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about major historical events of the 20th century and their impact on contemporary society. Topics to be covered include WWI; the Russian Revolution; terror and murder under Lenin and Stalin; the Treaty of Versailles; Hitler and the Third Reich; WWII; the Holocaust; the atomic bomb; the Cold War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War; the Berlin Wall; and the Israeli conflict.

Course Objectives:
1. cite major historical events in chronological order and location,
2. demonstrate an understanding of 20th century history in relation to the US,
3. identify significant historical figures of the 20th century,
4. discuss the impact of selected events on contemporary society, and
5. describe the rise of the US as a superpower.

HIS 805 – The Silk Road: From Venice to Chang'an

Learn about the major caravan routes from Venice, Italy to the ancient Chinese capital of Chang'an as it touched the arts, cultures and life ways of the civilizations that connected East and West. Discuss the development of the caravan routes; movement of goods and ideas; and music, culture, art and religion along the Silk Road.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the importance of ancient cross-cultural exchanges and their continuity and impact in the world of today;
2. identify, explain, and evaluate the arts and music of the Silk Road; and
3. discuss the locations, climates, and geographic features that influenced the major caravan routes.

HIS 807 – China-Burma-India Theater in WWII

Gain an in depth knowledge of events that occurred in the China-Burma-India theater of war from1931 to 1945. Topics include; generals and admirals on both sides; strategy, tactics and soldiers on both sides; weather and political situations with the countries in this theater.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss strategy, tactics, and conditions of warfare for both Allied and Japanese forces;
2. describe the effects of combat and weather conditions on soldiers from both sides; and
3. analyze the process of decision-making at the top levels of the Allied High Command concerning the CBI theater.

HIS 809 – Maryland Railroads during the Civil War

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the vital role played by Maryland railroads during the Civil War. Topics to be covered include John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry; the railroad and the assassination plot on Abraham Lincoln; the Union troops and the railroads; the B and O railroad; Jubal Early's 1864 Monocracy campaign; and Lincoln's funeral train.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze and discuss the vital role played by Maryland railroads during the Civil War,
2. describe John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry,
3. discuss Stonewall Jackson's raid on the B and O, and
4. review the legacy of Civil War railroads in Maryland.

HIS 810 – Maryland and the American Revolution

This course is designed to enable the student to examine the vital role that Maryland played in the American Revolution. Topics to be covered include Maryland's colonial beginnings and relationship with European powers and native Marylanders; the French and Indian war in Maryland; Maryland's significant contribution to the American Revolution; and The War of 1812.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the relations with England and the Native Americans,
2. describe the events of the French and Indian War in Maryland,
3. cite Maryland's significant contributions to the American Revolution, and
4. examine Maryland's role in the War of 1812.

HIS 811 – Architecture and History: Newport Rhode Island Mansions

This course is designed to enable the student to learn to identify the historical significance and architecture of houses in Newport, Rhode Island that were built at the turn of the nineteenth century during the Gilded Age, and their connection to Newport society at the time. Topics to be covered include the Breakers, Marble House, The Elms, Rosecliff, Miramar, Ochre Court, Belcourt Castle, Chateau-Sur-Mer, Beacon Rock, the Gilded Age, and Newport society.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the architectural features of Newport houses at the turn of the century,
2. discuss the historical significance of these mansions and the relationship to society in Newport, Rhode Island at the turn of the century, and
3. cite names of the builders and architects of these houses that were built during the Gilded Age.

HIS 812 – HISTORY/DANCE/AROUND/WORLD

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about about the history of dance. Topics to be covered include the history of dance; styles, influences, music, and types of dances characteristic of each culture; and stories, movements, costumes, and imagery of each culture.

Course Objectives:
1. develop an appreciation and deeper understanding of other cultures as expressed through dance;
2. discuss the art and form of the world's dancing, and apply it to their own dance culture;
3. learn about the history, legends, and mythologies of other cultures; and
4. explain how the dancing in modern ballet, ballroom, and Broadway musicals reflect other cultures and folk traditions.

HIS 813 – Classical Mythology

This course will enable the student to discover the pantheon of mythological gods and their personalities and adventures from both the Greek and Roman worlds. Topics to be covered include definition of the word myth; the Titans, the Olympians, and mortals; creation; lovers; the realm of Hades; sagas; heroes; the quest; adventures; the Trojan war; and after the Trojan war.

Course Objectives:
1. provide an overview of the major myths of the Classical Greek and Roman civilizations,
2. demonstrate an understanding of the nature of mythology and the function of myth,
3. examine the effect of classical myth on our modern culture, and
4. discuss the various artistic representations of mythology.

HIS 814 – John Smith's Chesapeake

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the Chesapeake watershed of the 16th and early 17th centuries, focusing on the Chesapeake that John Smith encountered when he arrived in the New World between 1603 and 1609. Topics to be covered include the culture and traditions of the native peoples of the area around the Chesapeake Bay; the ecology of the region at the time; the facts vs. the mythology of John Smith's exploration; Smith's influence at Jamestown; and the two 1608 exploratory missions on the Bay in the ship 'Discovery'.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the life and times of Captain John Smith and his impact on the traditional lifeways of the Chesapeake Bay,
2. discuss the ecology of the Bay and how it has changed since the explorations of 1608, and
3. discuss the native lifeways of the Bay and the tribes that inhabited the region in the early 17th century.

HIS 816 – Great American Authors Part II

Examine the classic work of great American authors: Edith Warton; Sinclair Lewis; William Faulkner; Ernest Hemmingway; and Eudora Welty.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze and discuss what may classify an author as 'great' and determine how this has developed and altered from the 19th Century to current times;
2. apply literary tools to assess the specific qualities of each work as a "good read", and the relationship to societal influences; and
3. compare, contrast, and discuss writing styles and each author's development of plot, themes, settings, and characters relevant to their durability.

HIS 817 – Survey of Jewish Culture

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the various elements of Jewish culture. Topics to be covered include history, language, customs, traditions, and literature peculiar to the Jewish culture.

Course Objectives:
1. identify and evaluate major historical contributions made by Jewish culture to the development of Western societies,
2. discuss with new insights how Jewish culture has affected Middle Eastern cultures and civilizations, and
3. demonstrate knowledge of Jewish traditions and literature.

HIS 819 – Great Commanders and Their Battles

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about ten Civil War commanders and how each commander won or lost a specific battle. It focuses on leadership and decision making and the military, political, and other various factors upon which victory or defeat hang. Topics to be covered include Antietam, McClellan, Chancellorsville, Hooker, Gettysburg, Meade and Lee, Shiloh, Grant, Nashville, Thomas, Bragg, Murfreesboro, Rosecrans, Stones River, Sherman, Snake Creek Gap, Hood, and Franklin.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss various styles of command employed by each of the ten commanders,
2. analyze decision making in each of these battles and the outcome of various decisions on the particular battle, and
3. identify various factors that affected the decision-making process of each commander.

HIS 820 – Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

Learn more about the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, the Statue of Zeus at Olympia, the Temple of Artemus at Ephesus, the Mausoleum of Maussollos at Halicarnassus, the Colossus at Rhodes, and the Lighthouse at Alexandria.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the architectural marvels known as the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World,
2. discuss the cultures that produced them and the geographic areas in which they existed, and
3. describe the reality versus the myths and legends that surrounded these places.

HIS 822 – Baltimore's Grand Estates: Their Architecture and Builders

This course is designed to enable the student to learn to identify 18th, 19th, and early 20th Century Baltimore estates, and their architects and builders. Topics to be covered include Guilford, Homeland, Stoneleigh, Mondawmin, Belvedere, extant houses Homewood, Garrett, Clifton, Cylburn, and Brooklandwood.

Course Objectives:
1. identify those early Baltimore mansions and their owners who influenced the city's business and cultural growth,
2. analyze how Baltimore grew from large county seats to commercial and residential neighborhoods, and
3. identify the architectural styles in vogue in pre-Civil War and post-Civil War Baltimore.

HIS 824 – Judaism and Christianity

This course is designed to enable the student to learn how Judaism and Christianity differ. Topics to be covered include why they pulled apart; why they became separate religions; when the parting took place; and what caused the split.

Course Objectives:
1. identify similar beliefs during the first two centuries of the common era;
2. discuss why these two religions are so important in the history of Western religion; and
3. discuss the common elements in the origins of Christianity and Judaism, and where they differ.

HIS 825 – Great American Authors Part III

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about a number of American authors and their works. Topics to be covered include Upton Sinclair, Sherwood Anderson, Betty Smith, John Steinbeck, and Nathaniel West.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze and discuss what may classify an author as "great", and determine how this has developed and altered from the 19th Century to current times;
2. apply literary tools to assess the qualities of each work, and its relationship to societal influences; and
3. compare, contrast and discuss writing styles and each author's development of plot, themes, settings, and characters, relevant to their durability

HIS 826 – Great Decisions 2011

Examine, through a non-partisan, balanced, informed discussion the challenges now faced by the United States and the International community. Topics include: rebuilding Haiti; US National Security; Horn of Africa; responding to the financial crisis; Germany ascendant; sanctions and nonproliferation; The Caucasus; global governance.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss foreign policy issues facing the United States;
2. explain points of reference, facts, and issues facing the United States; and
3. demonstrate familiarity with non-partisan and well-informed sources of background, current data, current US policy, and the pros and cons of alternate policy options.

HIS 827 – British Raids in the Chesapeake: 1813 to 1814

Gain a wider view of the War of 1812. Topics include: the British blockade of the Chesapeake Bay; the Treaty of Ghent in 1815; the British campaigns for Baltimore and Washington in 1814; the strategy and tactics of both sides; the impact of the British presence in the region; and the key personalities involved in this period.

Course Objectives:
1. examine the overall impact of the War of 1812;
2. describe the strategy and tactics of both sides;
3. discuss the personalities involved; and
4. explain the impact of the British presence.

HIS 828 – The History of Medicine

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the fascinating story of man's progress in the science and art of medicine. Topics to be covered include the roots of medicine; ancient, Greek, and medieval medicine; the cradle of modern medicine and science; and the 17th to the 21st century.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the progress of medicine from early man to the present day;
2. explain how medicine and disease have had an undeniable effect on the whole of history; and
3. describe how new problems lead to new horizons.

HIS 829 – Jews in America

Explore the story of the Jewish immigration to America from 1654 to the present day. Discuss 'waves' of immigration; why they left or were forced to leave Europe; how they found a home in this country; their contribution to American life; America's contribution to Jewish life.

Course Objectives:
1. examine the history of Jewish immigration to America,
2. discuss the myriad reasons why the Jewish immigrants came to America, and
3. analyze how the Jewish immigrants integrated and assimilated into American life.

HIS 831 – Exploring History through Art

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about human history from the art of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Topics to be covered include the cultural, political, economic, and religious factors of this period; the power brokers of the time; and factors that influenced and were expressed through the art.

Course Objectives:
1. evaluate the unique pieces of art specific to this time;
2. articulate the differences between the art from the Middle Ages and Renaissance art; and
3. discuss the interconnections between the factors that influenced the art of the time.

HIS 834 – East Central Europe I

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the politics and socio-economic make-up of East Central Europe, and its importance on the world stage. Topics to be covered include the origins of East Central Europe; the diversity of the population; the Orthodox orbit; the Roman Catholic orbit; the development of Poland; Czechoslovakia; the Hungarian civilization; and World War I and its consequences.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the origins of East Central Europe, its definition, geography and demography;
2. describe the diversity of the populations;
3. discuss Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia; and
4. analyze World War I and its consequences.

HIS 835 – East Central Europe II

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the politics and socio-economic make-up of East Central Europe, and its importance on the world stage. Topics to be covered include the dissolution of the Russian/Austro-Hungarian and German empires; independent Poland; democratic Czechoslovakia; Hungary; Yugoslavia; German Weimar Republic; World War II; and the Holocaust.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the dissolution of the German empire and the results of World War I;
2. describe the governments of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Yugoslavia; and
3. examine World War II and the Holocaust.

HIS 836 – East Central Europe III

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the politics and socio-economic make-up of East Central Europe, and its importance on the world stage. Topics to be covered include the USSR and World War II in Eastern Europe; post WW II; Iron Curtain states; the disintegration of the USSR; contemporary Poland; and the republics of Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Romania.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the USSR and World War II in eastern Europe;
2. describe the Iron Curtain states;
3. examine the republics of Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia; and
4. analyze World War II and its consequences.

HIS 840 – Joan of Arc

This course is designed to enable the student to learn to research and discuss the life and times of Joan of Arc. Topics to be covered include the background of the times; Joan's life; her capture, trial, execution, and retrial; and Joan in popular culture.

Course Objectives:
1. describe how an illiterate farm girl became the national heroine of France,
2. explain why she has been a political symbol since the time of Napoleon, and
3. evaluate the works created about her by major writers and composers.

HIS 841 – History of 19th the Century Master Composers

Explore the formal designs and expressive content from the Romanticism of the late 19th century to the Impressionism of the turn of the 20th century. Musical compositions of Claude Debussy, Gustav Mahler, Caesar Franck and Gabriel Faure will be used to introduce concepts.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate a familiarity with formal designs used by 19th century composers;
2. identify sonata, theme and variation, and rondo forms; and
3. increase the depth of understanding by applying knowledge of formal design to one¿s listening experience.

HIS 842 – WWII: In Western Europe: Battle of the Bulge to German Surrender 12/15/1944 to 5/8/1945

Gain an in-depth knowledge of the events that occurred in Western Europe during this period. Discussion will include the fighting in Lorraine, crossing of the Rhine, Battle of the Ruhr Pocket, the Bridge at Remagen and the critical decision not to take Berlin.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss strategies, tactics and conditions of warfare for both sides between 12/15/44 and 05/08/45;
2. describe the effects of combat and adverse weather conditions on the soldiers of both sides; and
3. analyze the process of decision-making at the top levels of the Allied High Command.

HIS 843 – WWII: Italian Campaigns: Sicily to the Liberation of Rome 1943 to 1944

Embark on a broad study about the strategy, tactics and conditions of the fighting in Sicily, Italy for both Axis and Allies including the Battle of Sicily, Salerno, Cassino and Anzio and how they became savage, bloody, tough campaigns.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the strategy, tactics and conditions of warfare in Italy during 1943-1944,
2. describe the effects of combat and adverse weather conditions on the soldiers, and
3. explain the complex reasons for allied selection of Sicily and Italy as a combat theater of war.

HIS 844 – South Africa: Voices of Past and Present

Explore the history and literature of South Africa through the works of Olive Schreiner, Sol Plaatje, Bessie Head and J.M. Coetzee. Investigate changes in attitudes, culture, literature and law over a 180 year period. Explore Apartheid and its effects on both the white and black South African cultures and the effects of attitudinal changes in both populations.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the literature of this period in context with its historical framework;
2. analyze and compare the work of four major writers using personal reflection and tools of literacy criticism including plot, characterization, theme, tone, and mood; and
3. identify literary techniques, style, and period influences.

HIS 845 – Buddhism: An End to Suffering

Learn about the life and teachings of the Buddha then follow the various transformations of Buddhism as it spread. Conclude with the examination of Buddhism in the West and its relevance to contemporary American life.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the life and teachings of the Buddha in the 6th century BCE in India;
2. assess the transformations and spread of Buddhism from India to Southeast Asia, Tibet, China and Japan; and
3. evaluate Buddhism as it is practiced in America and its transformation to fit American life and contemporary issues.

HIS 846 – American Politics and Government

Examine the U.S. Constitution, its foundation and effects on the U.S. political landscape. To supplement and illustrate important concepts, current events and policies will be discussed, along with political structure of the U.S.; purposes of representatives and presidents.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss current events in American politics, prevalent US political ideologies, stands of US political parties, and stands of political candidates;
2. analyze proposed policies with respect to the Constitution, to expected outcomes, and to political ideologies; and
3. identify political ideology from speeches and proposals, jobs of congressional representatives and presidents, and the political structure of the United States.

HIS 848 – The American Presidency Part 2

Examine some of the low spots in the course of American Presidency through a thematic approach. Uncover the ineptitude of James Buchanan and why he was one of the worst presidents; discuss why there was so much corruption during the presidency of U. S. Grant; explore Jacksonian democracy and how it was practiced and is "still practiced."

Course Objectives:
1. discuss how Buchanan obstinacy and personal feelings helped drive the US towards the Civil War, why despite scandals in the government Grant was able to get reelected and how the destruction of the Bank of the US by Jackson did not lead to a panic or a depression;
2. describe Grant¿s popularity and the public¿s willingness to forgive the scandals in his government, and how Jacksonian democracy affected the growth of the United States in the 1830s;
3. identify the Dred Scott Decision, the Lecompton Constitution, and the reasons why Jackson destroyed the Bank of the United States.

HIS 849 – The American Presidency Part 3

Learn how the Federalists and Democratic-Republican Parties were formed. Examine the Monroe Doctrine and what it means for America. Discover how the Vice Presidents fulfilled the promises of their office. Uncover the differences in the politics of good friends John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.

Course Objectives:
1. define how political parties developed in America, different approaches to the enforcement of the Monroe Doctrine, and the pros and cons of various Vice Presidents;
2. analyze the differences in the political views of Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, how reactions to various foreign excursions into the Western Hemisphere were handled by US Presidents, and the jobs rendered by some Vice Presidents; and
3. identify the differences between Federalists and Democratic-Republican, Napoleon 111 and the Emperor Maxmillian and the Venezuelan Crises, and Vice Presidents such as Thomas Marshall, George Dallas and Schuyler Colfax.

HIS 850 – Baltimore's Historic Houses of Worship

Explore the history and architecture of Baltimore's major religious landmarks, from the Oldtown Meeting House of 1781 to the modern buildings of today. Discuss what role the city played in the religious history of the United States.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the city's major religious landmarks and discuss their history and architecture,
2. examine Baltimore's role in U.S. religious history especially with regard to Methodism and Catholicism, and
3. discuss the role that immigration played in the development of the city's religious landmarks.

HIS 851 – Sherlock Holmes: Myths, Mystery, and History

Explore the myths, mystery and history surrounding author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's intrepid sleuth Sherlock Holmes through discussion, reading and commentary on themes, style, content of the novels and short stories and cultural references to the author's experiences and techniques.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the elements that transformed Sherlock Holmes into a mythic hero;
2. analyze historical events and their impact on the Sherlock Holmes stories; and
3. identify cultural references to the author¿s experiences and techniques.

HIS 853 – Issues in Froeign Policy

Examine the appropriateness of current U.S. foreign policy decisions with respect to several over-arching issues confronting the world, including globalization, international terrorism, environmental degradation and immigration. Discuss foreign policy objectives and how to determine the value of a foreign policy decision.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the purpose of foreign policy, different formulations of foreign policy, and pressing issues;
2. analyze foreign policy decisions for their appropriateness foreign policies; and
3. identify foreign policy factors, the bases of issues, and the causes of issues.

HIS 855 – The Silk Road: From Venice to Chang'an

Experience this conceptual journey from Venice, Italy to the ancient Chinese capital of Chang'an. Focus on origins of the Silk Road and geographic caravan routes touching on the arts/cultures/life ways of the many civilizations connecting East and West. Keep a weekly journal as though you were on the caravan.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the importance of ancient cross-cultural exchanges and their continuity and impact in the world of today;
2. identify, explain and evaluate the arts and music of the Silk Road; and
3. discuss the locations, climates and geographic features that influenced the major caravan routes.

HIS 856 – First African American President

This course is designed to explore the impact of having the first African American president and the conditions that led to his election in November 2008. Topics to be covered include American culture and race, voter behavior, campaign organizations and strategies.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate a understanding of the US political process;
2. evaluate the relationship among issues, personalities, ethnicities, and politics, and their effect on voter behavior; and
3. compare campaign organizations and strategies of the 2008 presidential candidates and how each affected the outcome of the election.

HIS 858 – The History of Piracy: Under the Black Flag

Learn about the history of piracy from the earliest known records to modern times. Topics include definition of piracy; piracy in the ancient world/on the China Seas; Golden Age of piracy; pirates such as Robin Hood; myth versus reality and modern images of pirates.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the development of piracy from its beginnings to the modern day,
2. demonstrate an understanding of pirate life-ways, tactics and motivation, and
3. discuss the difference between popular pirate myths and reality

HIS 860 – Africa: Politics/Geography/Culture

Evaluate the past and current events happening on the African continent and explore their causes. Topics include African empires; colonialism; decolonization; effects of natural resources and geography and effects of the Cold War and foreign aid.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the state of the African continent,
2. identify the major African states on a map, and
3. assess the causes of instability in a given state and discuss possible solutions.

HIS 862 – Vignettes of the Civil War

Explore a variety of different and diffuse topics on the Civil War - from battles to leaders to the common soldier to technological innovations. Learn about some of the famous and not so famous aspects of the Civil War.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss technological innovations,
2. identify the three major political issues and their constituencies, and
3. identify battles that affected the outcome of the war.

HIS 865 – Architecture and History: Newport, Rhode Island Mansions

Learn more about the historical significance and architecture of houses in Newport, Rhode Island built during the "Gilded Age" and their connection to Newport Society at the turn of the 19th century. Explore: The Breakers, Marble House, The Elms, Rosecliff, Miramar, Ochre Court, Belcourt Castle, Chateau-Sur-Mer, and Beacon Rock.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the architectural features of Newport houses at the turn of the century,
2. discuss the historical significance of these mansions and the relationship to society in Newport, Rhode Island at the turn of the century, and
3. cite names of the builders and architects of these houses during the Gilded Age.

HIS 866 – Current World Events: Three Perspectives

Expand your knowledge of world events by examining current happenings outside the U.S. Use the three perspectives of realism, liberalism and identity as a framework to focus on the world through different angles and explore information sources/geography/current events.

Course Objectives:
1. articulate the basic perspectives of sources of information, world geography, and current events as they relate to different cultures and economic conditions,
2. analyze current world issues as seen through a framework of different perspectives, and
3. assess how the different perspectives affect international relations.

HIS 867 – HISTORY OF ANTIQUES PART 2

Explore changes in styles from ancient times to the present with emphasis on Chinese exports, Majolica, silver flatware, Flow Blue, American furniture and lamps. Also, further investigate items for their societal significance and authenticity.

Course Objectives:
1. assess antique items for their fundamental use and style in different periods of history,
2. research various sources to determine the historic period and authenticity of antiques, and
3. identify the evolution of substance and style of antiques from ancient times to the present.

HIS 868 – The Art and Architecture of Venice, Italy

Discover how the Venetian economy and its status as a major trade port allowed for the sponsoring of massive amounts of painting, sculpture and architecture. This city's geographic location made it less susceptible to outside influences thus creating a unique artistic style.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the evolution of the city plan of Venice and interconnections of many islands around the Grand Canal,
2. identify the uniqueness of the art works in Venice compared to other countries, and
3. identify the artistic and stylistic progress in architecture throughout Venetian history.

HIS 869 – HISTORY/DANCE/WORLD/CULTURE

Discover how American dances relate to specific geographic regions and cultures. Learn the art and meaning of dance through social, cultural, and historical functions, and explore world dance forms and elements through lectures, videotapes, readings and performances. Discussion will include how these cultural forms influenced many styles of dance.

Course Objectives:
1. identify traditional dances from a variety of countries and their distinctive movements;
2. recognize and describe the storytelling, meaning, and dramatic elements of dancing; and
3. discuss how cultures share and enrich one another through dance.

HIS 870 – The Silk Road II: Maritime Routes

Discover how the lesser known passages through the Gulf of Oman, Indian Ocean, Straits of Malacca and the Celebes and South China Seas were vital to the development the Great Silk Road. 14h century journal entries will give eyewitness account of the travels along these great maritime sea routes.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the extent and impact of the Maritime Silk Road during its time and its legacy in the world today,
2. assess the value of the diversity and depth of human interaction before our own modern era, and
3. cite characteristics of cultures and life ways that were previously unfamiliar.

HIS 871 – Colonial America

Learn why European nations left life in a civilized land to explore the world and its unknowns, and following the discovery of America, why they continued to explore Northern and Southern American continents. Discover how European political ideas and Native Americans culture impacted the U.S. political system and its world dominance.

Course Objectives:
1. cite the reasons for European exploration of North and South America in Colonial America,
2. explain the impact of the interactions among Europeans, Native Americans and African slaves on American culture and civilization, and
3. discuss how political ideas imported from Europe and ideas borrowed from Native Americans created the dominant political system in the United States of America.

HIS 872 – HUMOR IN THE DEPRESSION ERA

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the styles of humor and the personalities of different authors who defined the role of American humor in a society beset by economic woes in the 1930¿s. Topics to be covered include the social function and evolution of literary humor during the Depression of the 1930¿s; writings of such authors as Robert Benchley, James Thurber, Will Rogers, H.L. Mencken; humorous styles and expression in radio and movie comedies such as the Marx Brothers, Fred Allen and Jack Benny; comparison of how humorous talents of the 1930s address national woes versus how today¿s wags and television humorists are grappling with the current economic downturn.

Course Objectives:
1. assess the role of humor and comedy during an economic depression,
2. identify major United States humorists of the 1930¿s and describe their styles and personalities, and
3. compare the humorists of the 1930¿s with those of today.

HIS 874 – American Presidency Part IV

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the American Presidents who only ran for one term. It will explore why they only had one term and what they accomplished after they left office. Topics to be covered include John Adams and the XYZ Affair; James K. Polk and the Mexican-American War; Benjamin Harrison; William Howard Taft; Jimmy Carter and the Iranian Hostage Crisis; and George Herbert Walker Bush and the fall of the Berlin Wall and Soviet Union.

Course Objectives:
1. identify why and how the Iranian Hostage Crisis occurred during Jimmy Carter's administration;
2. analyze how, under the Presidency of George Herbert Walker Bush, the Berlin Wall came down and the Soviet Union fell apart;
3. describe how, under the Presidency of James K. Polk, the Mexican-American War took place; and
4. describe the XYZ Affair, the reasons for passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts, and what it meant to the United States.

HIS 875 – MADOFF 21ST CENTURY ENEMY

This course is designed to enable the student to learn how to examine legal, economic and competitive issues with the Madoff fraud case and the impact on the stock market and retirement savings. Topics to be covered include: Madoff's violation of federal law; dynamics of Madoff's personal and professional background; and the economic impact of Madoff's scheme on the world economy.

Course Objectives:
1. explain competitive considerations inherent in Madoff's enterprise objectives;
2. identify the patterns of behavior, relationships and dynamics of Madoff's personal and professional background; and
3. describe how Madoff's coercive power to influence investors violated federal law impacted world economy.

HIS 876 – HORACE/TRUMBAUER/ARCHITECT

Students will study Horace Trumbauer's place as a little known but leading architect during America's estate building from the 1890's through the 1930's. Topics to be covered include: biography of Horace Trumbauer; his noteworthy rise as an uneducated young man to become patronized by America's richest families post the industrial revolution; his prolific commissions; and their impact on how Americans and Europeans viewed the new Beaux Arts architecture.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the architect with many landmark American houses and buildings,
2. describe what constitutes Beaux Arts architecture, and
3. discuss Horace Trumbauer, the man, his background, and his works.

HIS 877 – THE TRAGEDY OF VIETNAM

This course is designed to enable the student to learn how to correctly interpret the succession of events leading up to and during the Vietnam War, and to evaluate economic, political and military decisions to explain why this war produced a striking variety of viewpoints and subsequent reactions from all levels and segments of American society. Topics to be covered include the Communist threat; pre-existing political conflicts; impact of early unofficial U.S. involvement; the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution; inconsistency of Executive Department officials; cultural ignorance; nature of the Viet Cong strategy; failure of extensive bombing missions; My Lai; the siege of Khe Sanh; escalation and de-escalation; Vietnamization; home-front reactions; impact of the Tet Offensive; comparisons to other U.S. conflicts; intervention vs. declared war; and similarities to Iraq.

Course Objectives:
1. compare and contrast the legacies of Vietnam to those produced as a result of World War II,
2. assess policy implementation and resist hindsight perspectives to propose sensible alternatives to actual U.S. handling of the war, and
3. evaluate the justification for multilevel distaste over this war and compare/process similarities to the present war in Iraq.

HIS 878 – Rise and Fall of the Native Americans

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the development of Native American civilization and interface the impact of European colonization, subsequent industrialization, population migration, capitalist enterprise, policy inconsistency, collective apathy, and intolerance to gain an accurate historical perspective as compared to traditional explanations, presentations, depictions, and discriminatory rewriting of history. Topics to be covered include early migration to and settlement in America; initial relationships with Europeans; roles in European-based colonial conflicts and wars in America; savage vs. noble; who was who?; impact of industrialization; utilitarian use of Native Americans to advance various agendas; deliberate misrepresentation of intent; various open conflicts, the Nez Perce, truth about Custer; cultural indifference and devaluing of quality of life; quality of life vs. standard of living, impact of literature and film, reservation policies; forced migration; comparison and contrast to Africans suffering under legalized slavery; Manifest Destiny; Trail of Tears; and The Homestead Act.

Course Objectives:
1. identify actual Native American ideals and historical developments and compare and contrast them with propaganda;
2. evaluate the necessity of detrimental "Indian" policy and discriminate between the actual needs and zealous wants of generations of non-native Americans to assess and exemplify who the savages really were and why; and
3. compare and contrast historical discriminatory treatment of "Indians" with that of African slaves to determine which suffered most, and then compare and contrast contemporary viewpoints and treatment interfaced with the historical.

HIS 879 – MASLOW/DIALECTICS/HISTORY

This course will enable the student to learn how to interface dialectical principles with Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Need as applied to individual and collective human motivation, to gain a more meaningful perspective of situational history and historical societal evolution. Topics to be covered include dialectics as applied to history; Maslow's Hierarchy of Need and how it applies to immediate and evolving historical circumstances; the Great Depression and concurrent global depression; the Third Reich, WWII; the Iron Curtain; the Korean and Vietnam conflicts; roots of and ongoing Arab-Israeli conflicts; 9/11 terrorist incident; and various historical countercultural movements and more.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how manifold, multilevel, perpetual action/reaction, historical developments and significance unfold to produce a set of inevitable circumstances in a culture or civilization;
2. define interfacing human motivational factors within individuals, small collectives and autonomous established politico-economic entities throughout history and interpret historical occurrences as being a direct or indirect result of those motives; and
3. analyze all relevant identifiable factors surrounding and contributing to a particular historical event and make predictions and educated assumptions for comparison to other events past, present, and likely to occur in the future.

HIS 880 – Warfare in the Age of Napoleon

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about warfare during the period 1792-1815. The student will study the character and personality of Napoleon, then follow his campaigns and battles from 1796-1815; the Italian Campaigns of 1796-97 and 1800; Austerlitz 1805; Jena 1806; Eylau and Friedland 1807; Aspern-Essling and Wagram 1809; Spain 1808-1814; Russia 1812; and the 1813-14 Campaigns, and Waterloo 1815. Topics to be covered include the strategies and tactics of each battle; the plans, preparations, and movements of each army; the role of personalities and intrigues in events; the results and significance of each campaign; and the marshals, generals, opponents, and grognards who carried the tricolor from Portugal to Moscow.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate detailed knowledge of the character, personality, and military history of Napoleon, as well as his generals, opponents, and the ordinary solders of this period;
2. assess the strategy and tactics used in the campaigns and battles; and
3. discuss the impact of the Napoleonic period upon the US and European history.

HIS 881 – Current World Events

Expand your knowledge of world events. Examine current happenings in the world (outside the United States) using the framework of The Three Perspectives (realism, liberalism and identity), which focus on the world through different angles. Topics to be covered include sources of information, world geography, and current events.

Course Objectives:
1. articulate the basic perspectives of sources of information, world geography and current events as they relate to different cultures and economic conditions;
2. analyze current world issues as seen through a framework of different perspectives; and
3. assess how the different perspectives affect international relations.

HIS 882 – The 1960's: American Society's Turning Point

Learn about historic events and the consequences that transpired in the 1960's such as the Counter Culture, Medicare, War on Poverty, Vietnam War and America's space programs. Define the 1960¿s as an historical turning point in the US and how they changed the way society operates in this country and looks at various questions including morality, patriotism, and social consciousness. Topics include the spectrum of the `60s, political and scientific topics, musical trends, sports, and changes in societal attitudes that are still reflected in today¿s world.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the terms Great Society, New Frontier, Medicare, Counter Culture, SCLC, SNCC, SDS, and War on Poverty;
2. discuss how actions of the 1960¿s Presidents contributed to the development and shaping of American culture and the steps to globalism trending in today's world; and
3. describe how the Vietnam War contributed to patriotism, how creation of the welfare state may have influenced today's economic woes, and how space programs in America led to the great strides in telecommunications.

HIS 883 – America Between the Wars 1918-1941

This course is designed to enable the student to learn to evaluate the presidencies of Woodrow Wilson through FDR in terms of their impact upon early 20th Century America as well as upon contemporary political and economic states. Topics to be covered include Versailles, The Women's Movement, Prohibition, The 'Roaring' 20's, The Great Depression, socialist intervention, the causes for U.S. involvement in the war in Europe, and the 'Great Society' invented by FDR.

Course Objectives:
1. describe how the global economic movement worked to navigate the U.S. successfully through two wars,
2. evaluate the causes and effects of global economic depression, and
3. interpret how what took place decades ago has had such a prolific impact on contemporary America.

HIS 884 – Women's Role in Religion

Explore early evidence of women's role in Judaism, Islam and Christianity and how women in most major faiths have contributed greatly to theology and leadership. Examine the continual struggle of women throughout history to climb the ecclesiastical ladder and how the religious scene of the 21st Century has been strengthened by their efforts.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the early evidence of women's role in Judaism, Islam, and Christianity,
2. identify the women who climbed the ecclesiastical ladder through the 20th Century, and
3. discuss the impact of women of a new age in a man's world.

HIS 885 – Art History: 5000 B.C. to Modern Times

Students will examine the stylistic differences and artistic techniques between each period in art history from 5000 B.C. to Modern Times and learn the transitions of style that carry over from one period to the next. Topics to be covered include: art from the ancient world of Egypt, Greece, and Rome; Medieval Art; the Renaissance; and European Art from the 17th to 20th Centuries.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the stylistic differences in art of each period in art history,
2. discuss the transitions of style that carry over from one period to the next, and
3. compare techniques of the artists from one period to the next.

HIS 886 – U.S. Constitution and the Amendments

Learn the responsibilities/duties of the three branches of government and the rights guaranteed under the 27 Constitutional amendments. Discuss those of the Legislative Branch, and how a Bill becomes a Law; the responsibilities of the President/Administration to carry out the laws within the Executive Branch; how the Judicial Branch interprets the law, along with famous cases in Judicial history.

Course Objectives:
1. define the responsibilities of the legislative, executive and judicial branches of the U. S. Government;
2. explain how a bill becomes a law under the U.S. Constitution; and
3. discuss the 27 amendments to the Constitution and the rights guaranteed by them.

HIS 887 – Native American History

Explore the diversity of Native cultures in North America. Discover the rich traditions, culture and history of Native Americans. Learn more about the impact of Native Americans on the history of North America through topics such as Native American stereotypes; Native American pre-history; regional tribal history and culture; and Native American-European relations and popular sovereignty.

Course Objectives:
1. assess the role of race, class and gender on history;
2. apply an understanding of Native American issues to similar situations on a global scale;
3. identify the contributions of Native American peoples to American society; and
4. evaluate historical interactions between Native Americans, European colonists, and the US government.

HIS 888 – Exploring the Mystics: The Wisdom of the Ages

Explore the ideas and principles that mystics, sages, saints, heroes and hierophants have arrived at from ancient to modern times as they have found answers to universal questions. In this interactive course you will examine and discuss what some of the great religious and philosophical thinkers have said about time and eternity, heaven and earth, the spirit, soul and body of man, life and death, divine providence versus the wheel of fortune, the immortality of the soul and more.

Course Objectives:
1. research universal truths, laws, divine principles, divine ideas, and ideals;
2. apply the universal laws and principles to the mysteries that confront civilization; and
3. discuss The Wisdom of the Ages common to the great masters, sages, saints and mystics of every age.

HIS 889 – Consciousness: Near Death/After Death and Modern Science

Explore phenomena that will cause you to look at your world in a different way. Examine Near Death Experiences (NDE's) and After Death Communications (ADC's) which both take away people's fears of death and dying and seemingly give the answer 'Yes' to the question 'Does Consciousness exist after death?' Topics include: studies of NDEs being done worldwide by Cardiologists; the research project on ADCs by the Guggenheims; recent studies in Consciousness being done at major universities and institutes; and the newest branch of science Quantum Physics.

Course Objectives:
1. distinguish an experience as a near death experience, after death experience, or a synchronicity;
2. evaluate the new scientific studies by Guggenheim on after death experience and the work being done by cardiologists on near death experiences; and
3. examine Carl Jung's 'Synchronicity' and how it is used today by quantum physicists to define certain experiences related to consciousness.

HIS 890 – Great Supreme Court Decisions

Students will learn the various Supreme Court decisions and their impact on U. S. government and American society. This will include how the Supreme Court makes a decision upon a case, and the process that takes place when the Court announces its decisions. The students will become familiar with the facts of the lawsuits and they will recognize the importance each had on the course of American history. Topics to be covered include these various lawsuits and cases: Scott vs. Sanford, Plessy vs. Ferguson, Brown vs. Board of Education, Miranda vs. Arizona, Roe vs. Wade, Nixon vs. United States and many others.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss why the case Brown vs. Board of Education overturned Plessy vs. Ferguson and how these cases affected American history after they were decided;
2. explain how the Supreme Court makes a decision upon a case, and the process that takes place when the Court announces its decisions; and
3. identify Homer Plessy, Oliver and Linda Brown, Ernesto Miranda, and Richard M. Nixon; and the particulars of their lawsuits, their effect upon the situation at hand, and if applicable, their long-term effects on jurisprudence and life in American society.

HIS 891 – Communication From Beyond? Near Death, After Death Communication and Modern Science

Gain an understanding of how the process of consciousness and after-death communication is changing. Includes studies being done worldwide by cardiologists and the reasons for these studies. Discuss synchronicity to define certain experiences we have in our everyday lives, Guggenheim¿s scientific research on `After Death Experiences¿; and new discoveries in the field of quantum physics related to this research.

Course Objectives:
1. distinguish an experience as a near death experience, after death experience, or a synchronicity;
2. discuss the new scientific studies by Guggenheim on after death experience and the work being done by cardiologists on near death experiences; and
3. examine Carl Jung¿s `synchronicity¿ and how it is used today by quantum physicists to define certain experiences related to consciousness.

HIS 892 – Islam: Fact and Fiction

Learn the fundamentals of Islam, the life of a Muslim and contemporary "hot-button" issues such as Jihad, Women's rights, Shariah Law in these interactive sessions.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the true meaning of Jihad;
2. describe the life of a Muslim; and
3. discuss fact versus fiction of the stoning laws, blasphemy laws, and Shariah laws.

HIS 894 – Islam: Fact and Fiction

The culture and religion of Islam is a mystery to many. Join these interactive sessions to learn the fundamentals of Islam, the life of a Muslim, and contemporary "hot-button" issues such as Jihad, women's rights, and Shariah Law.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the true meaning of Jihad,
2. describe the life of a Muslim, and
3. discuss fact versus fiction of the stoning laws, blasphemy laws, and Shariah laws.

HIS 897 – Biographies of Historical Figures

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the lives and importance of six famous historical figures. Topics to be covered include Edgar Allen Poe, Charles Dickens, Marie Curie, Leonardo DaVinci, Joan of Arc, Jonas Salk, and Albert Sabin.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the importance of their lives and their impact on history,
2. identify the reason for each one¿s contribution to his/her sphere of influence, and
3. explain the value of their works in relation to the times in which they lived.

HIS 899 – Maryland and the Civil War

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the political, historical and cultural impact of Maryland's pivotal role as a border state during the Civil War. Topics to be covered include the coming of the war; Maryland on the edge of secession; The Pratt Street Riots; the occupation of Baltimore and the state anthem 'Maryland, My Maryland'; brother vs. brother: Maryland Units North and South; Maryland as battleground: Antietam, Hagerstown and Monocacy; the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in the Civil War; contemporary Marylanders who spoke and wrote about the war; the mad Booths of Maryland and the end of the Civil War; Postwar Maryland: Confederate and Union fraternal groups; and Civil War sites in Maryland today.

Course Objectives:
1. identify major campaigns in the war,
2. describe the political context for Maryland¿s unique position in the war, and
3. describe the impact of Maryland¿s position on the outcome of the war.

HIS 900 – Historic Manors of Maryland¿s Eastern Shore

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the wealth of early Georgian architecture in Maryland. Topics to be covered include architectural styles, methods of construction, brief family histories of owners, and historical significance to Maryland culture.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the ways in which the early manors were self-sustaining and how they depended on the waterways to thrive and prosper;
2. identify these houses by style of architecture and place them in the counties where they were built; and
3. explain why these houses were built, their builder's place in local history, and their contribution to the development of Maryland's growth.

HIS 901 – Intelligence Biographies

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about American intelligence, particularly its people, whose lives show what the intelligence community is all about. Topics to be covered include espionage, the early days, the European continent, Britain, America, American figures and traitors, and famous spies of fiction.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the ways in which we consider the American intelligence community from an organizational and operational standpoint;
2. explain how the heart of the community has always been its people; and
3. critique the life stories of intelligence personnel, both good and bad.

HIS 902 – The Middle East

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the development of the cultures and countries of the Middle East. Topics to be covered include the ancient Mediterranean, Islam, the Crusades, Imperialism, Middle Eastern Renaissance, wars, and terrorism.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate how the Middle East is the most volatile and dangerous region in the world,
2. discuss basic information on the development of the cultures and countries of this part of the world, and
3. answer the question 'Is this where civilization will end?'

HIS 903 – The Roosevelts: From TR to FDR

Gain an introduction into the lives of these two Americans who helped shape our country. Learn about their early lives and presidencies, and get insight into Teddy's politics; influence on the Republican party; his public life; Rough Riders; and his last years. Learn about FDR's education and marriage; bout with polio; time as Governor of New York; the New Deal; the Great Depression; WWII; and his relationship with Churchill and Stalin and more.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the ways in which these two men helped shape America;
2. analyze their influence on their political parties: the Republican and Democratic;
3. describe the path each took as they rose in importance in their political parties;
4. discuss the highlights of each one¿s presidency; and
5. cite specific problems each faced in his personal and political lives.

HIS 908 – Great Leaders of World War II

Students will learn about the fascinating lives and careers of important military and governmental figures during World War II. Topics to be covered include: the career of the leaders before World War II; how their talents were utilized during the war; how their important decisions affected the outcomes of the war; and what their lives were like after the war (if they lived to have one).

Course Objectives:
1. cite at least one important fact about each of the leaders covered in the course,
2. identify an important decision each leader made during the course of the war, and
3. discuss an important outcome achieved by the decisions these leaders made.

HIS 909 – History of 19th Century Master Composers

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the formal designs and expressive content in vocal and instrumental compositions by master composers of the last stages of romanticism as it evolved into what today is known as Late Romanticism. Topics to be covered include musical compositions by such masters as Gustav Mahler and Claude Debussy. Short excerpts from musical compositions will be used to introduce concepts.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate familiarity with formal designs used by 19th century composers;
2. identify sonata, theme, variation, and rondo forms; and
3. apply knowledge of formal design when listening to music.

HIS 910 – History of Jazz in America

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the evolution of jazz in America and its many styles, from the early twentieth century to the present. Topics to be covered include the precursors of jazz; the emergence of the improvised solo; swing and the styles which followed it (bop, cool, hard bop/soul jazz, free jazz, fusion); today's jazz scene, including 'smooth jazz'; jazz and American social/cultural history; and developments in Baltimore jazz.

Course Objectives:
1. recognize jazz's stylistic origins in European, African, and Caribbean sources;
2. evaluate its contribution to the history of music;
3. explain jazz music's intersection with American social history, including race relations; and
4. identify the major innovations and innovators in jazz music.

HIS 911 – Olympic, Titanic, Britannic: White Star¿s Unlucky Liners

The early 1900's were known as the Gilded Age. Few things represented that more than the enormous luxury lines that were being built by the White Star Line. This course will cover the Titanic and her lesser-known sisters Olympic and Britannic. While the Titanic is very well known, thanks to books and movies, her sister ships were also famous in their times. These three liners were the most unlucky trio of sister ships to ever sail the seas. Only one of them made it to old age. This course will include lecture, discussion and audio-visuals which will highlight the events surrounding the mishaps of these liners.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the myths surrounding the Titanic and how the movie depicted the reality of the sinking of the Titanic;
2. compare and contrast the mishaps experienced by the Olympic, Titanic, and Britannic; and
3. describe each ship and how it contributed to events during the early 1900's.

HIS 912 – Linclon: The Man and the Myth

Students will learn about Lincoln's rise to the Presidency, his handling of the Civil War, his assassination and how he became a 'larger-than-life' figure after he was assassinated. Lincoln was not a popular President, but consistently ranks in the Top Presidents of All Time. Topics to be covered include his early life; rise to the Presidency; his part in the Civil War; his assassination and legacy; and the making of Lincoln - the Iconic President.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how Lincoln was just a normal man in abnormal circumstances,
2. describe Lincoln¿s attempts to hold the Union together,
3. discuss Lincoln and slavery, and
4. evaluate how Lincoln was not a popular president, but consistently ranks in the leading Presidents of all time.

HIS 913 – WWII: Events of 1941

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the impact that the year 1941 had on World War II. Topics to be covered include the policies of the US and England, the fighting in the African desert, Hitler¿s invasion of Russia, Pearl Harbor, and the war in the Pacific.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the areas of the world in which the war was raging in 1941,
2. analyze the policies of the United States and England,
3. demonstrate how a European civil war erupted into a truly global conflict, and
4. discuss the roles played by Germany and Japan in WWII.

HIS 914 – Middle East Turmoil in the 21st Century

Learn to understand and analyze the turmoil in the Middle Eastern countries in 2011, and its worldwide impact. Topics include: Islam, a civilization and a community; worldwide threat of terrorism; Mubarak in Egypt; other uprisings; Israel, Jordan, Turkey and Iran; US and Western Europe¿s interests in the Middle East.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss events and factors that caused this turmoil,
2. identify the impact of terrorism on these events,
3. name the countries and their authoritarian regimes that are under fire, and
4. describe the strategy of the U.S. and its Western allies.

HIS 915 – The Bronte Family

Examine the life, works and times of Charlotte, Emily and Anne, who created literary artistry in the Victorian era. Though tragedy often defined their lives, the writing of these sisters inspired, intrigued and sometimes shocked their contemporaries. Within the backdrop of the 1800s, their writing styles made a legacy of classics that continue to absorb readers and scholars. Topics include: Their individual talents; lives, works, misfortunes and continuing influence; with a focus on their lives, philosophy, writing styles within the backdrop of the 1800s.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the different roles the sisters played and how, though the Victorian Era influenced their writing, they were able to use their gifts to produce unique contributions to literature;
2. compare and contrast the writing styles and their integration and creation of plots, characters, settings, and themes; and
3. analyze and discuss the continuing influence of these writers on current literature and film, and the qualities that continue to absorb readers and scholars.

HIS 916 – Jewish Kabbalah

This course is designed to introduce the student to Kabbalah, the mystical, esoteric, side of Judaism that delves into a deeper understanding of the Hebrew Bible. Topics to be covered include information about the soul; the nature of G-d, creation, and the spiritual world; and our individual relationship to G-d and each other.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the meaning of Kabbalah;
2. define the message of the Bible and apply it to our daily lives;
3. examine the Tree of Life, the twenty two letters of the Hebrew alphabet, and the thirty two paths that lead us to live a better life; and
4. explore the lives of major figures connected to the Kabbalah.

HIS 918 – The Supreme Court

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the workings of the US Supreme Court, especially landmark cases. Topics to be covered include special landmark cases; cases that are considered bad decisions: the Gore-Bush election results, and the Westboro Baptist Church decision.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss in general how the Supreme Court works;
2. analyze the term ¿landmark cases¿; and
3. examine and discuss three recent controversial decisions: Gore-Bush, corporations donating large sums of money to political candidates, and Westboro Baptist Church.

HIS 919 – Jews from the Southwest US

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the reasons why approximately 200,000 German speaking Jews immigrated to the Southwest United States. Topics to be covered include the Crypto Jews; Jews of the Mexican-American border lands; new Christians who were subjected to the Inquisition; and the mark they left on the land and culture of the Southwest US.

Course Objectives:
1. examine their struggles and show how they maintained their Judaism,
2. distinguish the differences between the early German Jews and the Crypto Jews who settled in the Southwest US, and
3. discuss their lives and their religion.

HIS 920 – Survey of Jewish Culture

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about various elements of Jewish culture. Topics to be covered include history, language, customs, traditions, and literature specific to the Jewish culture.

Course Objectives:
1. identify and evaluate major historical contributions made by Jewish culture to the development of Western societies,
2. discuss with new insights into how Jewish culture has affected Middle Eastern cultures and civilizations, and
3. demonstrate knowledge of Jewish traditions and literature.

HIS 921 – The History of Medicine

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the story of man's progress in the science and art of medicine. Topics to be covered include the roots of medicine; ancient Greek and medieval medicine; the cradle of modern medicine and science; and medicine from the 17th to the 21st century.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the progress of medicine from primitive man to the present day,
2. explain how medicine and disease have had an undeniable effect on the whole of History, and
3. describe how new problems lead to new horizons.

HIS 923 – 1862: The Union in Peril

This course is designed to enable the student to learn how strong the Confederacy was and how weak the Union was in the year 1862. Topics to be covered include Lee¿s victories at Manassas and Fredericksburg; Sherman¿s bloody repulse at Chickasaw Bayou on the Mississippi; and Grant being turned away from Vicksburg.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss Lee¿s victories in the 7 Days campaign,
2. describe the battles of Vicksburg and Chickasaw Bayou, and
3. analyze McClellan¿s failure at Antietam, and Bragg¿s retreat at Murfreesboro.

HIS 924 – 1942: The Year that Doomed the Axis

This course is designed to enable the student to learn how the Allied powers started 1942 with several major disasters on the fighting fronts around the world, and how the tide was turned toward the end of that year. Topics to be covered include the Japanese victories at Singapore, in the Philippines, and on a dozen or so islands in between; North Africa, the British, and Rommel; the Suez canal; Burma; the Volga river and Stalingrad; Midway; and Guadalcanal.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the losing battles at the beginning of 1942,
2. describe the battles of Singapore and the Philippines, and
3. analyze the battles of Midway and Guadalcanal, and show how the tide was turning in favor of the Allies.

HIS 925 – Art History: From 1400 To Modern Times

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the stylistic differences and artistic techniques between each period in art history from 1400 to modern times and how these transitions of style carry over from one period to the next. Topics to be covered include art from the ancient world of Egypt, Greece, and Rome; Medieval Art; the Renaissance; and European Art from the 17th to 20th Centuries.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the stylistic differences in art of each period in art history,
2. discuss the transitions of style that carry over from one period to the next, and
3. compare techniques of the artists from one period to the next.

HIS 926 – FDR, Truman, and Eisenhower

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the thirty most tumultuous years of the 20th Century and the three presidents who governed the USA during those times. Topics to be covered include the personal lives and experiences of these three presidents; their political views; their styles of governing; their involvement in WWII; the Great Depression; and WWII.

Course Objectives:
1. identify how these three presidents¿ personal lives and experiences formed their political views and styles of governing,
2. discuss their involvement in WWII, and
3. describe the great depression (disaster) and the Second World War (triumph).

HIS 927 – Roman Catholic Church: A Brief History

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about truth, fiction, and the power of Rome in the old and new world of Catholicism. Topics to be covered include Monasticism, enlightenment and schisms, interpretation of Holy Scripture, tradition, inspiration, and human infallibility.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how the fallible Holy Scripture is interpreted by humans alleged to be infallible, and manipulated for special effects;
2. describe the growth and changes in Catholicism in the old and new world;
3. discuss how traditions, inspiration and common sense affected interpretation of Holy Scripture; and
4. research further interpretations of the Holy Scripture.

HIS 928 – The Roaring Twenties

This course is designed to enable the student to explore and analyze the 1920¿s, the decade also known as the Roaring Twenties, that saw an incredible amount of change in America. Topics to be covered include the dominance of jazz music; new dances such as the Charleston; Prohibition; the coming of the Great Depression; and the changing of values and ethics.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze the decade known as the Roaring Twenties;
2. analyze the 1920¿s from an economical, musical, artistic and moral standpoint; and
3. demonstrate an understanding of how the 1920¿s impacted the future decade by changing from prosperity to poverty.

HIS 930 – History of Japan: Samurai Version

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the history of Japan as exemplified by the warrior culture of the Samurai. Topics to be covered include the development of the feudal system in Japan from the 12th to the 19th centuries; and the impact of historical development on the politics, culture, and lives of the Samurai.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the growth of the feudal court system of the Heian period (794 to 1185) that was heavily influenced by the Chinese and the beginnings of the feudal system in Japan,
2. discuss the growth and development of a unique Japanese civilization brought about through the unification of Japan under military dictatorships of powerful shogun, and
3. describe the breakdown of the feudal system and the beginnings of modernization spurred by military and economic pressures from the West.

HIS 931 – 1692: The History of the Salem Trials and the Crime of Witchcraft

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the witchcraft hysteria that engulfed a New England village. Topics to be covered include the crime of witchcraft and its history; witchcraft and religion; the making and identification of a witch; witchcraft and its social environment; and the economic basis of witchcraft.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the historical background of the crime of witchcraft and its social and economic basis,
2. compare witchcraft and Puritan belief,
3. research the Salem trials and their place in the history and the evolution of famous trials in America, and
4. discuss the making and identification of a witch then and now.

HIS 932 – Presidential Assassinations

Gain an introduction to the legacy of Fredrick Law Olmsted, America¿s first landscape artist. Discuss how he, and later, Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects, reshaped the urban Maryland landscape. Topic include: Central Park in NYC, Capital grounds in D.C., 130 Olmsted projects planned in Maryland.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the events leading up to the assassination of each President,
2. explain the motives of these assassins to kill the President of the United States,
3. identify the political and social consequences of each assassination, and
4. articulate the names of each assassin and the punishment each received.

HIS 933 – Baltimore¿s Historic Houses of Worship

Learn the importance of Baltimore¿s historic houses of worship: churches that are monuments to heaven. Topics include examples of: windows; statuary; paintings; mosaics; carvings; and religious artifacts.

Course Objectives:
1. discover how the building of these churches parallels the immigration patterns into Baltimore as well as the development of the city itself,
2. discuss how each place had its own story to tell, and
3. cite examples of outstanding features of each house of worship.

HIS 934 – Exploration of Three British Museums

This course is designed to introduce the student to three of the most exciting museums in Europe. Topics include: The Victoria and Albert museum, famous for its design collection; the National Gallery in London, whose collection boasts art from da Vinci, Michelangelo , Raphael, Rubens, Van Gough and more; The Tate Museum showcasing the collection of British art from 1500 to the present day.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the essentials of the Renaissance Romantic composition,
2. discuss classical painting effects and how they evolved into the modern period, and
3. demonstrate an understanding of the leading role 21st century museums play in the creation of the contemporary urban landscape.

HIS 935 – The Influence of Ideologies on Mankind

This course is designed to enable the student to learn to analyze the role and importance of political, social, and economic ideologies in shaping mankind¿s political institutions and government structures. Topics to be covered include definition of ideologies, meaning of nationalism, role of religion, militarism, political ideologies, capitalism, welfare state, and socialism.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze the role and importance of these ideologies,
2. discuss mankind¿s political institutions and government structures, and
3. demonstrate an understanding of capitalism, welfare state, socialism, fascism, communism, and Nazism.

HIS 936 – Jews of the Northwest, including Alaska and Canada

This course is designed to enable the student to discover how Jews set up pioneer communities in the Northwest. Topics include; the wandering peddler; theJewish merchants; benevolent societies; the cemetery.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss why and how Jews came to the Northwest,
2. analyze how Jewish communities were established on the frontier,
3. compare the beginnings of Jewish communities to those of other faiths, and
4. discuss what happened to religious practices on the frontier.

HIS 937 – Jewish Understanding of the Christian Bible

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the sacred texts of a religion that is closely related to others. Topics to be covered include the origins of Christianity, the Jewish religion, and objective reading of these important documents.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the origins of Christianity;
2. examine the fundamental tenants of the Jewish religion;
3. demonstrate the ability to read and discuss the texts of another religion with respect, but not necessarily with, belief; and
4. demonstrate how themes and ideas flow from Jewish texts into Christian texts and back into Jewish life.

HIS 938 – Great Decisions 2012

This course is designed to offer the student a non-partisan, balanced, and informed discussion on the challenges now faced by the United States and the International community. Topics to be covered include: Middle East realignment; promoting democracy; Mexico; Cybersecurity; Exit from Afganistan and Iraq; State of the Oceans; Indonesia; Energy Geopolitics.

Course Objectives:
1. develop informed, thoughtful, and articulate views on foreign policy issues facing the United States;
2. demonstrate the acquisition of a basic and accepted collection of points of reference and facts, and demonstrate an understanding of issues facing the United States; and
3. demonstrate the ability to discuss current U.S. policy, and the pros and cons of alternate policy options, using non-partisan and well-informed sources of background and current data.

HIS 939 – History and Art of Screen Painting

Explore the history and examine the art of screen painting that was so popular in 20th Century Baltimore. Topics include: from Czechoslovakia to New York to Baltimore; the nature of paint and wire on a job; the one way screen; folkart form; its spread into the 21st century and its popularity far beyond Baltimore.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the history of the painted screen,
2. identify a number of Baltimore artists, and
3. discuss how to produce a painted screen.

HIS 941 – First Ladies of the United States

Examine the lives, roles and effectiveness of the wives of different Presidents of the United States. Compare and contrast the way different First Ladies carried out their duties and espoused their causes. Topics to be covered include first ladies as mothers, wives, ambassadors, hostesses, tone-setters, and daily managers in the Executive Mansion.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the roles different First Ladies played while their husbands were busy with the business of governing the United States,
2. analyze the ways First Ladies set a tone for the social life envisioned by a particular president,
3. identify how First Ladies, or even `first hostesses,¿ ran the everyday responsibilities at the Executive Mansion, and
4. discuss how the First Ladies¿ relationships were impacted by how a president comported himself while executing his responsibilities.

HIS 942 – The Executive, Emergency Powers, and Democracy in an Age of Terrorism

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the emergency powers that have been enacted to confront the threat of terrorism in the 21st century. It will explore whether a strong executive is compatible with a democracy, the division of powers within the government, and the people as a source of sovereignty. Topics to be covered include the division of emergency powers in government; democracy, terrorism, and individual rights.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the compatibility of new government emergency powers with the system of democracy in the U.S.,
2. assess the ability of governments to find a balance between protecting public safety and preserving civil liberties in an age of terrorism,
3. cite the relative effectiveness of a strong executive versus the division of powers within the U.S. government in the new age of terrorism, and
4. discuss one¿s conception of democracy and how it does or does not fit into the complexities of the current era.

HIS 943 – Architecture and History: Newport Rhode Island Mansions

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the historical significance and architecture of houses in Newport, Rhode Island built at the turn of the nineteenth century during the Gilded Age, and their connection to Newport society at the time. Topics to be covered include the Breakers, Marble House, The Elms, Rosecliff, Miramar, Ochre Court, Belcourt Castle, Chateau-Sur-Mer, Beacon Rock, the Gilded Age, and Newport society.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the architectural features of Newport houses at the turn of the century;
2. discuss the historical significance of these mansions and the relationship to society in Newport, Rhode Island at the turn of the century; and
3. cite names of the builders and architects of these houses during the Gilded Age.

HIS 944 – History of Antiques: Part 3

This course will enable the student to learn the fundamentals and historic periods of antiques with special emphasis on toys, silver, lighting, artwork, doorstops, and furniture from Victorian times to 1950. Topics to be covered include the history and evolution of styles during this period and further investigation of items for their societal significance and authenticity.

Course Objectives:
1. assess antique items for their fundamental use and style in this period of history,
2. research various sources to determine the historic period and authenticity of antiques, and
3. identify the evolution of substance and style of antiques from Victorian times to 1950.

HIS 946 – Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the history and beauty of the Barrier Reef, Ayers Rock, and the cities of Melbourne and Sydney in Australia; New Zealand and the cities of Christchurch and Queenstown, as well as Mt. Cook; and the glaciers and tropics of Fiji. Topics to be covered include the native Aborigines of Australia, the native Maoris of New Zealand, the history and founding of New Zealand and Australia, environment and natural resources, and current economic and political issues.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the native peoples of Australia and New Zealand;
2. describe the evolution of the ancient cities to where they are today; and
3. identify the unique differences in the environment and natural resources in Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji.

HIS 947 – The Greeks

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about ancient Greece from 500-336 B.C. as the cradle of Western civilization. Topics to be covered include the formation of the Greek people and the city-states; geography of Greece and surrounding areas; classical Greek art, architecture, myth, and religion; and the ancient Greek historians Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the ancient ruins, art, and architecture of Greece;
2. discuss the evolution of the geography of ancient and classical Greece and its surrounding areas; and
3. explain the importance of mythology and religion in ancient Greece.

HIS 948 – Roman Empire: Rise and Fall

Enhance your knowledge and relevance of the history and key events of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire. Topics include: Rome¿s founding and impact on world history; economy; its industry and trades; its culture, leadership, and everyday Roman citizen.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the relevant historical highlights, timelines, and personalities of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire;
2. analyze the important outcomes resulting from famous battles in and around Europe, as well as the effectiveness of Roman government and influence; and
3. identify the key Roman personalities that played an important role in Roman history.

HIS 949 – The World of Demonology

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about demonology and how different religions and cultures view demons. Students will discuss the stages and signs of a demonic haunting, as well as the different methods used to expel demons. Students will learn how to evaluate paranormal cases to determine if they are classified as demonic, and how to tell the different classifications of hauntings apart from the demonic. Students will also have the opportunity to analyze famous demonic cases.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the four stages of a demonic haunting,
2. discuss how different religions view the demonic,
3. discuss how different cultures view the demonic,
4. learn how to identify a demonic haunting from other hauntings,
5. identify different methods of dealing with demons, and
6. evaluate seven famous demonic cases and discuss each one.

HIS 950 – Turning Points in American History: Part I

Examine 24 turning points in the short history of the United States ¿ landmark moments that forever altered the direction of this country. Discuss events from 1617 to 1873 including the great epidemic, beginning of slavery, Boston Tea Party, declaring independence, transportation revolution¿and baseball.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss how these events changed the character of America politically, culturally, and economically;
2. evaluate groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts;
3. record dramatic military victories and defeats;
4. recall nationwide social and religious movements; and
5. describe technological and scientific innovations.

HIS 951 – Turning Points in American History: Part II

This course is designed to enable the student to learn twenty-four turning points in the short history of the United States, landmark moments between 1873 and 2001 that altered the direction of the country. Topics to be covered include Bloody Sunday in 1873 that ended reconstruction; the first red scare of Haymarket in 1886; that "damn cowboy" Theodore Roosevelt in 1901; bold experimentation of the New Deal in 1933; the power to choose with the Pill in 1960; the personal computer in 1975; and the age of terror with the 9/11 attacks in 2001.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss how these events changed the character of America politically, culturally, and economically;
2. evaluate groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts;
3. record dramatic military victories and defeats;
4. recall nationwide social and religious movements; and
5. describe technological and scientific innovations.

HIS 952 – Long Island Gold Coast Estates

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the works of America¿s most celebrated residential architects on New York's Long Island, home to over six-hundred of America's Gilded Age estates. Topics to be covered include the estates and their history and architectural styles; the powerful families who built the estates; their architects; and their emergence in America.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the towns of Long Island¿s Gold Coast and the estates built within them,
2. describe the country lifestyle of America¿s new commuting upper-class and the impact of social and economic changes on them, and
3. identify the many architectural forms and styles of house building on the Gold Coast and the architects who designed them.

HIS 953 – Crimes and Their Controversies

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about some of the most significant crimes from the past and the controversies that still surround them. The course will include basic forensic science and the importance of the forensic evidence presented in each case. Topics to be covered include Jack the Ripper; Mary Phagen; Leopold and Loeb; the Scottsboro Boys; the Lindbergh Kidnapping; Dr. Sam Sheppard; the Rosenbergs; President John F. Kennedy's Assassination; the Texas Tower Sniper; Ted Kennedy and Chappaquiddick; assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy; The Manson Family; The "Fatal Vision" murders, and Jon Benet Ramsey.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the application of forensic evidence to decide questions arising from crimes;
2. access the effectiveness of scientific evidence as it relates to debate and formal argumentation in legal cases; and
3. identify the conspiracies, political cover-ups, and racial issues in each case that create on-going controversies.

HIS 954 – Maryland¿s 29th Division in World War II

Explore the U.S. Army from the time the Germans marched into Paris in June 1940 through its evolution into one of the greatest military machines in history. Examine the life of the American soldier in World War II using Maryland¿s 29th Division as a microcosm of all American units that served. First-hand discussion of the stories of sacrifice and heroism will be shared.

Course Objectives:
1. explain the Army¿s evolution to one of the greatest military machines in history between 1900 and 1944,
2. cite the significance of Maryland¿s 29th Division in World War 11, and
3. describe first-hand accounts of sacrifice and heroism experienced by veterans of the 29th Division.

HIS 955 – Middle East Turmoil in the 21st Century Part II

Analyze the turmoil in the Middle Eastern countries in 2011. Discuss the world wide impact of the events that took place there. Topics include: influence of Islam; post WWI era; Arab Spring revolts; the modern Muslim; government and politics in Iraq, Tunisia, Afghanistan, Pakistan; worldwide threat of terrorism; US Middle East policy.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss events and factors that caused turmoil in the Middle East,
2. identify the impact of terrorism on these events,
3. name the countries and their authoritarian regimes that are under fire, and
4. describe the strategy of the U.S. and its Western allies.

HIS 956 – Influence of Political, Social, and Economic Ideologies on Mankind

Gain an understanding of the importance of political, social and economic ideologies in shaping mankind¿s political institutions and government structures. Topics include: definition of ideologies and nationalism; the role of religion; Militarism; democratic systems; non democratic political ideologies; Marxism; Communism.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the meaning of ideologies and nationalism;
2. identify the role of religion in shaping a society¿s ideology;
3. define Marxism, Communism, and militarism; and
4. describe democratic and non-democratic ideologies.

HIS 957 – Presidential Election of 2012

This course is designed to help the student analyze the role and importance of the presidential election of 2012 and its impact on American society. Topics to be covered include political and economic ideologies; the American presidential system; presidential powers; the electoral and voting process; and the office of vice-president.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the meaning of presidential and economic ideologies,
2. identify the presidential powers,
3. describe the electoral and voting process, and
4. assess the importance of the office of vice president.

HIS 958 – World War II: the Events of 1942

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the events of 1942, from January to June. Topics to be covered include the Battle of the Atlantic; North Africa; the Eastern front; air operations over Europe; Burma and the East Indies; Philippines; carrier raids; Battle of the Coral Sea; Battle of Midway; and Allied conferences and strategic planning.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss some of the most famous disasters of the war that took place during this period;
2. describe the battles of Singapore, Burma, and the Philippines;
3. evaluate the slaughter of American cargo ships and tankers off the East Coast of the U.S. and in the Caribbean;
4. discuss Rommel¿s successful offensive in the North African desert; and
5. analyze the battles of Midway and Guadalcanal, and show how the tide was turning in favor of the Allies.

HIS 959 – World War II: the Events of 1942 Part 2

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the events of 1942, from July through December. Topics to be covered include the Battle of the Atlantic, North Africa, Eastern Front, air operations over Europe, Burma and the East Indies, New Guinea, Guadalcanal air and land battles, and the impact of 1942 on the outcome of WWII.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss some of the most famous Allied disasters of the war that took place during this period;
2. describe the battles of Stalingrad, Guadalcanal, and New Guinea;
3. evaluate the turning of the tide in favor of the Allied forces as a result of these battles;
4. discuss Rommel¿s successful offensive and failures in the North African desert; and
5. analyze 1942¿s impact on the outcome of World War II.

HIS 960 – United States Judiciary System

Gain an understanding of the role and importance of the US Judicial system and its impact on American society. Topics include: the importance of a judicial system in a democratic society; its constitutional role; structure of the Federal Court System; the US Supreme Court; the current court; the Bill of Rights; hot topics; review of major Supreme court decisions.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the importance of a judicial system in a democratic society,
2. contrast the structure of the federal court system and the Supreme Court,
3. explain the Bill of Rights,
4. evaluate issues such as abortion and other private matters, and
5. review major Supreme Court decisions.

HIS 961 – 17th Century Baroque and Rococo Art

Gain an introduction to the magnificent art of the 17th century Europe, better known as Flemish and Dutch Baroque and Rococo art. Topics include: the works of the great artists of the time: Rembrandt, Vermeer, VanDyke, Peter Paul Ruben and more.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the artists of the Flemish and Dutch Baroque and Rococo art period;
2. explain how the history of the time influenced the art and inventions of that era;
3. identify inventions of the period including the Stradivarius violin and the first microscope; and
4. list some of the great inventors and personalities of the period including Galileo, Descartes, and Marie de Medici.

HIS 962 – History of Mystery

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the origins and development of mystery, detective, and espionage fiction. Topics to be covered include the first 1000 years, Sherlock Holmes and his rivals, Cozies and Christies, hard-boiled and noir, espionage, and mysteries across the country and around the world.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss mysteries as a literary genre and a reflection of popular culture;
2. research how mystery stories developed in film, television, radio, and comic strips; and
3. discuss a favorite author and characteristics of one's work.

HIS 963 – East Asia and the West

This topic is designed to enable the student to learn the difficult interaction between two cultures, namely East Asia and the West. Topics to be covered include East Asia on the verge of modern times, China and the West, the Meiji restoration, the Hermit Kingdom, World War II in East Asia, the occupation of Japan, and East Asia in the late 20th Century.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the unique culture, political thought, philosophy and literature of China, Japan, and Korea;
2. describe East Asia¿s uneven dealings with the West since the 18th century; and
3. discuss the difficult interaction between two cultures and political systems, as East Asian countries sought to find their place in a modern world not of their making.

HIS 964 – East Asia Before 1800

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the historical development of East Asia before it encountered major cultural and political incursions from the West. Topics to covered include East Asian traditions, schools of thought, earliest Japan, Korea, the Mongols, Chinese literature, and the literature of Japan and Korea.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the unique culture, political thought, philosophy, and literature of these three Asian countries;
2. describe East Asia¿s historical development before Western intervention;
3. list the things that Korea, Japan, and China have in common and their diversity; and
4. analyze their traditional times as a background for understanding these countries today.

HIS 965 – Communist Threat In American Science Fiction Films Of The 1950's

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the theme of maintaining our humanity as seen in American science fiction films of the 1950s, including It Came From Outer Space, Invaders From Mars, and Invasion Of The Body Snatchers. Topics to be covered include conflict between authority figures and science; concept of the alien invader as an unemotional group consciousness that attempts to erase the concept of human individualism; the alien menace as destroyer of the American family; and the depiction of alien invasion as an anti-human force that destroys us both from within and without.

Course Objectives:
1. describe causes of the conflict between authority figures and the world of science,
2. dissect the cause of alien invasion as an attempt to replace the American individual with the then current threat of the Soviet Union¿s communist mentality to bury us,
3. describe the manner in which alien invasion attempts to destroy the American family as envisioned during the decade of the 1950s, and
4. cite examples of how alien invasion attempts to destroy humanity both physically and psychologically.

HIS 966 – Maryland ¿ Pre-History to 1860

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the history and culture of the state of Maryland and its peoples. Topics to be covered include prehistoric Maryland, early exploration and settlement, the French and Indian War, Maryland and the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, tobacco and the rise of the seafood industry, the War of 1812, Maryland¿s transportation infrastructure, political parties and factions, abolition, slavery and the Underground Railroad, and the North-South divide.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the unique geography of Maryland, from the mountains to the sea;
2. name the indigenous Native American tribes and show their impact on Maryland place names;
3. discuss Maryland¿s role in the French and Indian War, the American Revolution, and the War of 1812;
4. assess the importance of the tobacco and seafood industries in Maryland history;
5. explain the value of the National Road, the B and O Railroad, and the C and O Canal to the transportation industry in Maryland; and
6. discuss slavery, abolition, and the Underground Railroad in the lives of Maryland¿s slave population.

HIS 967 – Masterpieces From The World Of Art

Learn what makes a work of art a masterpiece. Students of art history will explore works of the following artists: Vermeer, Caravaggio, Leonardo da Vinci, Toulouse Lautrec, and Chuck Close.

Course Objectives:
1. analyze several works of art from different periods by different artists;
2. discuss details such as technique, information on the artist, composition of the work of art, and the revealing of hidden meaning and other artistic qualities; and
3. demonstrate an understanding of the formal qualities as well as historical content of the art works.

HIS 968 – The Spanish Civil War

The course is designed to enable the student to learn the roots of the Spanish Civil War and its aftermath. Topics to be covered include the first Spanish constitution in 1812; the history of Spanish constitutionalism; the rise and fall of the monarchy; the clash of the three political doctrines ¿ Marxism, Socialism, and Anarchism ¿ with each other and with capitalism; democracy and fascism; and an overview of the actual war and its aftermath.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the conflicting political theories that led to the war,
2. identify the critical issues of the various constitutions, and
3. demonstrate an understanding of the conduct of the war.

HIS 969 – History of American Musical Theatre

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the history of American musical theatre, from 1890 (the minstrels, operettas and vaudeville) to the golden years of Broadway. Topics include the lives and careers of Florenz Ziegfeld, Irving Berlin, George M. Cohan, Oscar Hammerstein II and Jerome Kern.

Course Objectives:
1. demonstrate an understanding of the glorification of the American woman in the spectacular reviews by Florenz Ziegfeld,
2. discuss the importance of George M. Cohan and Irving Berlin¿s patriotism in creating the songs and musicals that captured the American spirit, and
3. evaluate the importance of breaking racial barriers on Broadway.

HIS 970 – French Revolution

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the French Revolution as the most violent political revolution in modern times. Topics to be covered include its effect on world history; the Napoleonic legend; `Liberte, Equalite and Fraternite¿; and comparisons to today¿s revolutions in the Middle East.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss why the French Revolution is considered a pivotal event in modern history;
2. discuss why the cry `Liberte, Equalite, Fraternite¿ is still relevant today, especially considering the many current revolutionary movements; and
3. analyze the effects of this revolution on world history while demonstrating how the Napoleonic legend was born.

HIS 971 – Notorious Crimes in Hollywood

Examine some of the most notorious crimes associated with `Tinsel town¿; such as Roscoe ¿`Fatty¿Arbuckle; Anita Hill and Bugsy Siegel; Errol Flynn; George Reeves; Confidential Magazine Trail; Marilyn Monroe (suicide or political cover-up); Natalie Wood (terrible accident?); O.J. Simpson (If the glove does not fit ¿ you must acquit¿). Topics include: the background players; the suspects; the motives involved; the crimes scene investigation/forensic evidence; the trail (if applicable); and the outcome/aftermath. The course will make use of audio-visual material whenever possible.

Course Objectives:
1. describe the importance of crime-solving techniques associated with each case;
2. cite the validity of forensic evidence in the outcome of the case trials; and
3. dissect the interrelationship among the suspects, investigation, evidence and motives and other variables that could create the controversies with some cases.

HIS 972 – The European Theater in WW II

This course is designed to enable the student to learn how the United States mobilized for WW II, and to study the key figures, such as President Roosevelt and General Marshall. Topics to be covered include contentious debates that centered on the diverse strategies and options available in Europe and the Mediterranean; the Battle of the Atlantic; the invasions of North Africa, Sicily and Italy; the strategic bombing of Germany; Paris during the liberation; the Battle of the Bulge; and the relationship with our Soviet allies just prior to V-E Day.

Course Objectives:
1. cite the significance of key figures such as President Roosevelt and General Marshall in the war;
2. evaluate the contentious debates about the diverse strategies and options available in Europe and the Mediterranean; and
3. assess the importance of the battles, different invasions, and strategic bombing of Germany to the final juncture with our Soviet allies prior to V-E Day.

HIS 974 – The 1930¿s: Agony and Recovery

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the agony and recovery that the citizens of the United States experienced in the 1930¿s. Topics to be covered include the stock market collapse and its ramifications; the election of FDR; the New Deal; talking movies; super movie stars; night time baseball; and the rise of German power.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the New Deal programs initiated during FDR¿s presidency;
2. explore the many factors that led to World War II;
3. discuss the different technologies during this period; and
4. discuss the interplay of politics, theatre, and sports during this period of American history.

HIS 975 – Civil War: Secret and Signal Services

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the agents and activities of both the Union and Confederate secret and signal services in Maryland during the Civil War. Topics to be covered include the plot to assassinate Lincoln, the Confederate line through Maryland, the Union signal and observation towers in Maryland, Harriet Tubman, and Mary Surratt.

Course Objectives:
1. explain the meaning of agents, activities, secret and signal services, and
2. discuss these topics from a Union as well as a Confederate view.

HIS 976 – Art and History of Renaissance Florence

This course is designed to enable the student to learn about the art and history of Renaissance Florence, and the social, cultural and artistic development of Florence from the 13th to the 16th centuries. Topics to be covered include the growth of the commune, the rise of the Medici, the literary works of Dante and Machiavelli, and the genius of the Florentine artist.

Course Objectives:
1. explain how Renaissance humanism was a movement that established Florence as the birthplace of the modern age;
2. research areas of painting, sculpture, and architecture through the works of famous artists; and
3. identify museums, churches, city buildings, and streets that illustrate Florence as a monument to the Renaissance.

HIS 977 – Turning Points in American History: Part I

This course is designed to enable the student to examine 24 turning points in the short history of the United States ¿ landmark moments that altered forever the direction of the United States of America. Topics to be covered include: events from 1617 to 1873. Some samples include: 1617 the great epidemic; 1619 slavery begins; 1773 Boston Tea Party; 1776 declaring independence; 1807 transportation revolution; 1845 the ultimate American game- Baseball.

Course Objectives:
1. discuss how certain events changed the character of America politically, culturally, and economically;
2. evaluate groundbreaking political and philosophical concepts;
3. enumerate dramatic military victories and defeats;
4. discuss nationwide social and religious movements; and
5. describe technological and scientific innovations.

HIS 978 – Shariah Law: Fact or Fiction

This course is designed to give the student an understanding of Shariah law supported by the Quran and the life and teachings of Mohammad. Topics include: killing the blasphemer; stoning the adulterer; killing the apostates; eliminating the homosexuals.

Course Objectives:
1. explore the facts and fallacies associated with Shariah law,
2. describe the dangers of Shariah in America and the West, and
3. demonstrate an understanding of the myths associated with Shariah law.

HIS 979 – Comedy¿s Golden Age

Experience the joy and laughter of Comedy¿s Golden Age and progression of comedy from burlesque, vaudeville, motion pictures (`silent and `talkies¿) to radio and television. Review some of the most famous comedy acts up to the 1960¿s: their formation; their `rise to the top¿; their `brand¿ of humor; their movies; their personal lives; and their eventual breakup and its aftermath. Topics include: The Keystone Kops (the mishap chase); Laurel and Hardy (another fine mess); The Three Stooges (slapstick); Abbott and Costello (word play).

Course Objectives:
1. discuss the progress of comedy from burlesque to radio and television;
2. describe the unique style of humor of comedy acts such as Laurel and Hardy, the Three Stooges, and Abbott and Costello, and how their style reflected societyat the time; and
3. explain the rise of comedy acts and the cause of their eventual fade-out.

HIS 980 – A Colorful History of Las Vegas

This course is designed to enable the student to learn the historical development of Las Vegas from an organized crime money machine to an international adult playground. Topics include: organized crime and gambling; Bugsy Siegel and Hollywood; the Flamingo Casino; the Mob Years; casinos; entertainment and competition. The following names all refer to Las Vegas today: Sin City, The Desert Oasis and The Strip. Where and how did it begin? Who were the major players in the development and expansion of Las Vegas? How do you keep the games legit? The answers to these and other questions will be answered and discussed in this survey course of Las Vegas.

Course Objectives:
1. identify the major players in the development and expansion of Las Vegas, Nevada;
2. describe what happened to Bugsy Siegel and his vision when the Mob took over;
3. discuss the meaning of Sin City, The Desert Oasis, and The Strip in Las Vegas; and
4. explain the gaming action of all play levels in the casinos and how the games are kept legitimate.

HIS 981 – Russian Nationalist Composers

This course is designed to give the student an insight into a group of Russian composers of the 19th century who wanted to establish a nationalist school of music. Topics include: the works of Mussorgsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Balakirev, Borodin and Cui.

Course Objectives:
1. list the different names of this group ¿ The Mighty Handful; The Five; The Russian Five; The Mighty Heap;
2. discuss the meaning of a nationalistic school of music;
3. examine the lives and musical influence of these composers; and
4. discuss such works as `Night on Bald Mountain¿; `Capriccio Espangol¿; and the opera `Prince Igor.¿

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